Fayetteville Flyer News, Art & Life in Fayetteville, Arkansas 2019-01-18T17:49:32Z https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/feed/atom/ Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Weekend Flyer: Every Brilliant Thing, Corey Smith, and more]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196147 2019-01-18T16:24:21Z 2019-01-18T15:52:33Z

Friday, Jan. 18

Tyler Kinchen & The Right Pieces / Courtesy

TheatreSquared’s new show, the one-person ‘Every Brilliant Thing’ starring veritable Broadway star Liz Callaway, is playing this weekend at Nadine Baum Studios. There are several chances to see it. Here’s the list.

One of the biggest local fundraisers for the American Heart Association is Friday night at Fayetteville Town Center. It’s Paint The Town Red, and this one has a “Paint Through the Decades’ theme. It’s always a party, for a great cause. More info is here.

Theres’s a comedy show at Stage 18 with Little Rock comedian, Jay Jackson.

Music-wise, Tyler Kinchen & The Right Pieces is at Smoke & Barrel Tavern. Stop what you are doing (reading this post?) and watch this video right now.

Local 90s tribute The Mixtapes are at George’s as well. There’s a lot more below.


Full list:

5:00 pm

Razorback Swimming & Diving vs Houston

HPER Building – UA Campus
Sports
6:00 pm

Earl & Them / Upright Citizen

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
7:00 pm

Paint the Town Red – “Paint Through the Decades” Vol. II

Fayetteville Town Center
Fundraiser
7:30 pm

Take Cover

JJ’s Grill – Springdale
Music
7:30 pm

TheatreSquared: Every Brilliant Thing

Nadine Baum Studios
Performance
8:00 pm

Benjamin Del Shreve

Dickson Street Pub
Music
8:00 pm

Comedians NWA Presents: Jay Jackson

Stage 18
Comedy
8:00 pm

Homeschool Dropouts

Mojo’s Pints & Pies
Music
8:00 pm

Melody Pond

Black Apple Crossing – Springdale
Music
8:30 pm

Shotgun Billys

JJ’s Grill on Dickson
Music
8:30 pm

Willie Mack Patsy

JJ’s Grill on Steamboat
Music
9:30 pm

The Mixtapes

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
9:30 pm

We Ain’t Dead

Backspace
Music
10:00 pm

Tyler Kinchen & The Right Pieces

Smoke & Barrel Tavern
Music

 

Saturday, Jan. 19

Corey Smith / Courtesy

Trike Theatre has a new family-friendly show opening this weekend. The company will perform Go, Dog. Go! in the Starr Theatre at Walton Arts Center, with several shows set for this weekend and next. Here’s more info.

There’s a five band bill at Backspace on Saturday night, with noise-punk band Tom Boil and loud rockers Plastic Palms of Tulsa, along with locals The Phlegms and Ankle Pop, and New York-based Vamanos.

Also in tunes, songwriter and frequent Fayetteville visitor Corey Smith will be at George’s, and locals Foggy Bobcat and Trumann Rail Boys will play at Stage 18.

A group of local kids have organized a fundraiser to purchase sleeping bags to distribute to the homeless in our community. The event, called Youthfest 2019, is set for Saturday at the Guisinger Building (1 E. Mountain) in Downtown Fayetteville. It will feature live music by local folk band Smokey & The Mirror, along with pizza by Wood Stone Craft Pizza, donuts from Rick’s, raffles, a marshmallow dodgeball competition, and more. Here’s more.

There’s a lot more below. Have a great weekend, everyone.


Full list:

9:00 am

Fayetteville Farmers’ Market

Ozark Natural Foods
Community
10:00 am

Trike Theatre: Go, Dog. Go!

Walton Arts Center
Family
10:30 am

Super Saturday: Chinese New Year Celebration

Fayetteville Public Library
Family
11:00 am

2019 NWA Women’s March

Fayetteville Town Center
Community
1:00 pm

Free class: How To Eat To Lose Weight

Ozark Natural Foods
Community
2:00 pm

Chess @ the Library

Fayetteville Public Library
Activity
2:00 pm

Film noir series with Benjamin Meade: Double Indemnity

Fayetteville Public Library
Community
2:00 pm

TheatreSquared: Every Brilliant Thing

Nadine Baum Studios
Performance
2:00 pm

Trike Theatre: Go, Dog. Go!

Walton Arts Center
Family
4:00 pm

Trike Theatre: Go, Dog. Go!

Walton Arts Center
Performance
6:00 pm

Local Color Art Teacher Show and Reception

Local Color Studio Gallery
Art
7:00 pm

Dale & Billy

Core Public House – Mall Avenue
Music
7:30 pm

The Atlantics

JJ’s Grill – Springdale
Music
7:30 pm

TheatreSquared: Every Brilliant Thing

Nadine Baum Studios
Performance
8:00 pm

Amarugia Ridge Runners

Dickson Street Pub
Music
8:00 pm

Ashtyn Barbaree

The Nines Alley
Music
8:00 pm

Ciderday Night Comedy Show: Narado Moore & Carter Clascock

Black Apple Crossing – Springdale
Comedy
8:00 pm

Flashback

Mojo’s Pints & Pies
Music
8:00 pm

Foggy Bobcat / Trumann Rail Boys

Stage 18
Music
8:00 pm

Tom Boil / Plastic Psalms / The Phlegms / Ankle Pop / Vamanos

Backspace
Music
8:30 pm

Dial Up

JJ’s Grill on Dickson
Music
8:30 pm

Ocie Fisher

JJ’s Grill on Steamboat
Music
9:00 pm

Corey Smith

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
9:00 pm

Emily Rowland

The Nines
Music
9:00 pm

Makin Loaf

West & Watson
Music

 

Sunday, Jan. 20

Full list:

1:30 pm

Experience Fayetteville road bike group ride

Columbus House Brewery
Activity
2:00 pm

Author Will von Bolton: Loophole to Happiness

Fayetteville Public Library
Literary
2:00 pm

TheatreSquared: Every Brilliant Thing

Nadine Baum Studios
Performance
5:00 pm

Free class: Zero Garbage Presentation

Ozark Natural Foods
Community
9:00 pm

Magic Beans

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
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Terry J. Wood <![CDATA[Razorbacks struggling with a trip to Ole Miss looming]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196161 2019-01-18T15:33:58Z 2019-01-18T15:33:58Z

Photo: ArkansasRazorbacks.com

There’s no use in the Arkansas Razorbacks pushing the panic button after their 1-3 start in SEC play. Panic is a useless emotion on the basketball court, and that should be evident to them after their performance at Tennessee.

The No. 3 Vols plowed over the Hogs, 106-87, last Tuesday, and if the Razorbacks are honest with themselves, they did show a bit of panic on the road at Knoxville. The Razorbacks didn’t get their act together until the second half when the game was essentially over.

Next up for the Razorbacks

Who: at Ole Miss
When: 12 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19
Where: Oxford, Mississippi
Watch: SEC Network

Remaining schedule

Jan. 23 – Missouri
Jan. 26 – at Texas Tech
Jan. 29 – Georgia
Feb. 2 – at LSU
Feb. 5 – Vanderbilt
Feb. 9 – at South Carolina
Feb. 12 – at Missouri
Feb. 16 – Mississippi State
Feb. 20 – at Auburn
Feb. 23 – Texas A&M
Feb. 26 – at Kentucky
March 2 – Ole Miss
March 6 – at Vanderbilt
March 9 – Alabama
March 13-17 – SEC Tournament

The Razorbacks did play better in the second half, and that is what coach Mike Anderson has been focusing on as the Hogs prepare for the back half of their two-game road swing at Ole Miss at noon Saturday in Oxford, Miss.

The Rebels (13-3, 3-1 SEC) had their 10-game winning streak snuffed out Tuesday at Oxford by the LSU Tigers (13-3, 3-0 SEC). The Tigers took control of the game in the second half with their size to post an 83-69 victory at Oxford.

The Razorbacks should take a cue from the Tigers, and attempt to work the Rebels inside and press their advantage with the size and skill of Daniel Gafford in the paint. While the Hogs lost to LSU, 94-88, in overtime, the game was arguably their best performance since early in December. Gafford scored 32 points in the game, and while the Hogs don’t necessarily need 30 from their big man to win, he still needs to touch the basketball on every trip down the floor that does not end in a transition basket.

Another key to the contest is taking care of the basketball. The Rebels have excellent guard play, led by 6-4 senior Terrance Davis (16.1 ppg.) and 6-2 junior Tyree Breein (17.2 ppg), who work opponents over on both ends of the floor.

The Razorbacks suffered 19 turnovers against the Vols, and had them in damaging clusters which allowed Tennessee to capture the momentum early and build an insurmountable lead.

The Hogs’ nervousness and tentative play made for an easy victory for Tennessee. A repeat performance of that indecisiveness at Oxford will bring only more misery for the Hogs and an easy victory for the Rebels.

Arkansas point guard Jaylen Harris needs to find his equilibrium, and execute at a higher level than he did against the Vols.

Seeing the Hogs struggle through their first four SEC games gives little confidence that the Razorbacks will be able to pull it all together on the road against a solid team like Ole Miss.

However, in recent years Anderson has been able to get his Razorbacks to respond and play better after similar starts. Again relying on Gafford is a key, but guards Isaiah Joe and Mason Jones must be a factor in scoring, too.

After having a particularly poor game against Florida, Joe looked hesitant to shoot against LSU. Maybe, hitting 4 of 6 three-pointers in the second half against Tennessee will help his confidence.

Other than Gafford, Jones has perhaps been the Hogs’ most consistent performer. While he is a good outside shooter, he becomes even more dangerous when he cuts and drives. When he’s moving and not setting up for his jumper, Jones gives Harris more options in the Razorbacks’ motion offense.

Anderson has a tough decision to make at the small forward spot. Freshman Reggie Chaney is outperforming junior Adrio Bailey and sophomore Gabe Osabuohien. However, Chaney also serves as Gafford’s backup in the Razorbacks rotation which keeps Anderson from moving Chaney up.

Bailey is essentially trying to do too much. He needs to slow down and let the game come to him. He needs to learn the virtue of passing after getting an inside rebound and passing up open shots that aren’t in his range.

For the first time this season, the Razorbacks looked intimidated last Tuesday against the Vols. Tennessee is a strong, experienced squad, and more than a few teams are going to experience similar beat downs at their hands. However, the Razorbacks — no matter how young they are — can’t allow that to happen at Ole Miss or really against any other opponent the rest of the season if they want to pull themselves out of the SEC cellar and have a chance at postseason play.

I would expect the Razorbacks to respond to Anderson and play better against the Rebels on Saturday. Stealing a road game at Oxford would be a huge lift for an inexperienced Razorbacks squad that is still stumbling to find its way as February is quickly approaching. However, winning at Oxford might take the Razorbacks’ best effort of the season.

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Terry J. Wood <![CDATA[Ambition cracks Shyamalan’s ‘Glass’]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196150 2019-01-18T15:07:37Z 2019-01-18T15:07:01Z

Universal Pictures

Writer-director M. Night Shyamalan’s “Glass” is a tricky movie that’s bound to be divisive.

It does not deliver what most probably anticipated from a sequel to Shyamalan’s films “Unbreakable” (2000) and “Split” (2017), but that’s not necessarily a bad. Or is it?

The movie does pit the invulnerable super hero David Dunn/The Overseer (Bruce Willis) from “Unbreakable” against the multi-personality, sociopathic murder Kevin Wendell Crumb/Horde/The Beast (James McAvoy), but in a somewhat grounded version of a classic super-hero tale, there is no real victor because both are captured and locked up in a mental institution, where the bulk of the movie plays out.

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There they along with Elijah Price/Mr. Glass (Samuel L. Jackson) the villain from “Unbreakable” undergo group psychoanalysis by Dr. Ellie Staple, a psychiatrist who specializes in treating patients who have delusions of grandeur.

The question is whether Dunn, Crumb, and Price are delusional or actually possess super-human abilities?

Along for the ride are Casey Cooke, (Anya Taylor-Joy) the lone surviver of the teens kidnapped and terrorized by The Horde in “Split;” Joseph Dunn, (Spencer Treat Clark) The Overseer’s son who acts behind the scenes to aid in the heroic crusade; and Mrs. Price, (Charlayne Woodward) Mr. Glass’ supportive mother.

It must said that “Glass” is not a movie intended to stand on its own. It relies on the viewer having seen both “Unbreakable” and “Split” not only to catch its nuances but also to support the story.

Like all of Shyamalan’s films, the movie is shot well, and what action it contains, works, but the film is a slow burn, and unfortunately fails to fully deliver on the grand finale the film seems to set up

McAvoy once again shines as Crumb. Not all of the character’s 23 personalities are on display, but in the ones McAvoy unspools, he’s terribly convincing and entertaining.

Willis is engaged as Dunn. He doesn’t just sleepwalk through the movie as he has been known to do in recent years, but it’s not a very demanding role. Dunn is a man of action, not words; however, he’s cooped up in an insane asylum for the bulk of the film.

Likewise, when given the opportunity, Jackson chews scenery like a lion, but his character is sedated or pretending to be through most of the film.

Though the movie does offer a few surprises, there’s no stunning twist that Shyamalan became renown for following his initial 1998 hit “Sixth Sense.”

The movie itself is sort of a grand twist on the core concept of the X-Men comics, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, but it’s clumsily executed from my point of view.

Shyamalan’s message to be wary of society stifling the individual is nice, I guess, but on the whole, I would have preferred a bit more action built in to my super-hero morality play. Unfortunately, Shyamalan promises too much in the first two acts, but delivers too little in the film’s third.

(PG-13) 2 hr. 9 min.
Grade: C


Classic Corner

RKO Radio Pictures

Murder, My Sweet
If you like mysteries, yarns about private detectives, or the procedural dramas that dominate much of network TV, then you at least owe a tip of your hat to the 1944 noir classic “Murder, My Sweet.”

Turner Classic Movies is airing the adaptation of Raymond Chandler’s 1940 novel “Farewell, My Lovely,” at 11 p.m. Saturday night.

The film stars Dick Powell as Chandler’s hard-boiled detective Philip Marlowe, and the film directed by Edward Dmytryk excellently captures the grit and desperation of the novel as well as as Chandler’s first-person narrative style.

The plot is convoluted and unrolls from Marlowe’s point of view as he’s being interrogated a by police Lt. Randall about his knowledge of the murders of ex-con Moose Malloy (Mike Mazurki) and the wealthy Mr. Grayle (Miles Mander).

Marlowe became involved when Malloy hired him to find his old girlfriend Velma Valento, whom he was with prior to his eight-year stretch in the pen. While trying to track down Valento, Marlowe accepts another job as a bodyguard for ladies man Lindsay Marriott (Douglas Walton) who is to act as a go-between for a ransom payment for some stolen jewels.

During the meet-up for the ransom, Marriot is shot dead, and Marlowe is knocked unconscious. When Marlowe awakens and reports the murder to the police the next day, he’s warned to not interfere in a case involving a Jules Amthor, but when pumped for information by a woman posing as a reporter, Marlowe can’t keep his nose out of the mystery.

The film moves quickly like Chandler’s page-turner novel, but in doing so it still sets up all the trappings and conventions of the modern detective and cop stories that we still find so interesting today.

Powell, known for his light comedy work prior to this film, is cast against type, but his charisma in the role of Marlowe opened the door for the dramatic and tough-guy roles that populated the second half of his acting career.

The cast which includes Clair Trevor and Anne Shirley in the pivotal roles of Helen and Ann Grayle respectively support Powell well, with the massive Mazurki being particularly threatening as the ex-con in search of his best girl.

Though the film is dated, its mystery should keep anyone unfamiliar with the story guessing from the structure of the story and the skill in which Dmytryk stages it.

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Brian Sorensen <![CDATA[Northwest Arkansas gets first foeder]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196138 2019-01-18T14:46:20Z 2019-01-18T14:46:20Z

Hawk Moth owner and brewmaster Bradley Riggs / Photo: Brian Sorensen

Have you ever heard of a foeder?

Chances are you haven’t. Especially if you aren’t the nerdiest of craft beer nerds.

Foeders are specialized brewing vessels that are used in a relatively small number of breweries across the United States. They originated in Europe, where they were primarily used to make wine before crossing over to the brewing industry.

Foeders are essentially giant wooden barrels that support the fermentation and conditioning of beer. Their construction allows beer to breathe, so to speak, with oxygen slowly entering the vessel through pores in the wood. This is the perfect environment for beers that are purposely soured with bacteria.

Even when fermented clean, without funk-producing bacteria, the resulting beer is unique. It generally picks up the character of the foeder’s wood planks.

Perhaps the most famous brewery using foeders is New Belgium Brewing Co. in Fort Collins, Colorado, which makes some of the world’s most outstanding sour beers. New Belgium has more than 60 of these vessels housed in what it calls the “foeder forest.” If you’ve ever had La Folie or Le Terroir you know the magic that can result from this method of brewing.

Hawk Moth Brewery & Beer Parlor in Rogers recently announced the acquisition of its own foeder, which is the first in Northwest Arkansas and only the second in the state (Lost Forty Brewing Co. in Little Rock owns the other).

“Maybe we’ll build a foeder forest of our own here in Arkansas,” said Hawk Moth owner and brewmaster Bradley Riggs.

Riggs recently took possession of a custom nine-barrel white oak foeder manufactured by Foeder Crafters of America in St. Louis, Missouri.

“A lot of people use them for wild beers,” said Riggs, though he doesn’t plan to use bacteria in his brewhouse at this point due to the risk of infecting every beer in production. “With anything barrel-aged it’s not going to be as tight as stainless. It’s part of the give and take of these things. It’s hard to duplicate batches, and that’s part of the fun.”

Riggs said the concept for his foeder is to brew an oak-aged stout year-round. As beer is pulled out and sold he’ll top the foeder off with fresh beer — a method known as solera brewing.

Currently there is a Russian imperial stout conditioning inside the new foeder. Riggs said he anticipates the beer will be ready by late Spring and will finish somewhere around 10% ABV.

“We also want to use it to blend other barrels so we can get as many uses as we can throughout the year.”

Four months and counting

Photo: Brian Sorensen

Hawk Moth has been open for a little more than four months now, and according to Riggs, things are going gangbusters at the east Rogers brewery.

“Time is really flying by,” he said. “Our first quarter was awesome, and we have high hopes for 2019. People can tell that we’re doing something different.”

The brewery has hosted a number of barrel-aged beer releases and other special occasions like beer dinners and glassware parties. Many of these events have required tickets in order to attend.

Ticketed events are fairly new to the Northwest Arkansas beer scene, but according to Riggs, the region’s beer drinkers have been very receptive to the idea.

“It has honestly worked out better than we thought,” he said. “Everything has been so well received that we’re selling out within hours [of making tickets available to the public]. It’s very flattering to see it happen. It tells me the market was ready for it.”

Hawk Moth constantly rotates its beer, though the one that’s always on tap is a 4.3% French-style table beer called The Interurban. It is a lightly-hopped wheat beer that sports 35 IBUs.

Photo: Brian Sorensen

Despite its year-round availability, The Interurban is not the brewery’s best seller.

“It’s funny,” said Riggs. “We’re doing all these old-world French and Belgian-style beers, but at the end of the day, it’s the IPA.”

Hawk Moth’s IPA is constructed with what Riggs describes as a west coast grain bill with an east coast hop schedule. Known as The Hoppy Tap, the beer utilizes a different combination of hops each time it’s brewed. Batch #5 showcases Centennial and Citra hops and weighs in at 7.2% ABV.

“It turns over every three weekends or so, which means it’s always fresh,” said Riggs.

Hawk Moth is a small brewery with a small staff, and distribution is mostly limited to draft and crowler sales in the taproom. Bottled beer is also available from time-to-time. According to Riggs, the newly-acquired foeder may lead to more bottled offerings in the future.

Look for Hawk Moth at Frost Fest in Fayetteville on Feb. 2. The brewery will have four or five beers on hand, including one that won’t be released in the tap room until the following weekend.

And don’t forget to visit the brewery this coming spring, when Northwest Arkansas will get its first taste of locally-produced foeder beer.

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Mount Sequoyah hopes to attract visitors with new artist residency, culinary programs, and more]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196025 2019-01-18T17:49:32Z 2019-01-17T23:44:58Z

The Cross overlook at Mount Sequoyah / Courtesy

A non-profit organization located on one of Fayetteville’s famous Seven Hills is working to reinvent itself a bit lately.

Mount Sequoyah Center, the 32-acre retreat and conference facility established by the Methodist churches in the region nearly a century ago as a location for church camps and retreats, split from the church in 2016 and has been independently operating since then.

The organization recently hired local design firm Archetype Productions to help with a rebranding effort, along with local consultants The Velocity Group to help create a new vision for its park-like grounds and dozens of multi-use buildings built over the years. The hope is to encourage more locals to spend time enjoying the campus.

As part of that process, Mount Sequoyah officials are also working to develop new programming, starting with a recently announced artist residency program created in partnership with the University of Arkansas School of Art.

Christina Karnatz, Director of Development and Communications for Mount Sequoyah, said the program aims to address a specific need in the artist community.

Fayetteville Yoga Festival is one of several events that take place on Mount Sequoyah

Fayetteville Yoga Festival

“What we found was, despite all the growth of the art culture in NWA, that there was something missing,” Karnatz said. “We needed a place where artists can come to retreat and work, but also a place that can connect with artsts from other disciplines.”

The organization and UA last month announced a new program called “Creative Spaces at Mount Sequoyah,” which is designed to support artist residencies, studio spaces, and public arts programming on the mountain. The program was created through the work of an advisory board made up of members from the UA’s program in Creative Writing and Translation, the Department of Theatre, the School of Art, and the Walton College of Business, along with local artist community representatives Danny Baskin and Kathy Thompson.

Lisa Marie Evans / Courtesy

“Via multidisciplinary public events, the residency program, and the studios, Creative Spaces at Mount Sequoyah will serve as a connector for all who engage the arts in northwest Arkansas. Ideally, we’ll convene to appreciate, to cross-pollinate, and even to co-create,” said Adrienne Callander, assistant professor of both the School of Art and the Walton College of Business who will be involved in the program.

Mount Sequoyah last year hired Kansas City artist Lisa Marie Evans in a part-time role to organize exhibitions and public art events, and to build the artist residency program.

“Creative Spaces at Mount Sequoyah will thrive as a gathering place for artists to build connections with peers and community through panels, workshops, residencies, studios, and other art related events,” Evans said in a news release about the program. “Something magical happens when a space is dedicated to fostering creativity and learning. Collaborations and connections have the potential to weave their way from our doorstep to other countries and continents.”

In addition to the residency program, Mount Sequoyah also recently hired chef Justus Moll, formerly of River Grille in Bentonville, to help create a new culinary program.

“We are planning a series of events that will focus on his great food, but will also tie into our mission as an educational non-profit,” Karnatz told us this week.

Moll started in his new position on Jan. 7, and the first public culinary event is a brewmasters dinner in partnership with Fossil Cove Brewing Co. set for Feb. 23.

After that, Moll will conduct regular farm-to-table dinners, beer and wine tasting dinners, pop up dinners, educational classes, and other events focused on food.

“Justus will also be here if you have a wedding, for in-house catering, meetings, or any other event,” Karnatz said.

As the program develops, information on the various culinary events will be announced via the Mount Sequoyah Facebook page.

Chef Justus Moll cooking at Fayetteville Roots Festival

Photo: Meredith Mashburn

On top of the programming additions, some of the historic buildings on campus are also receiving upgrades at the moment. Clapp Auditorium has a coat of paint, and will get new flooring, for example. Parker Hall, one of the first buildings built on the campus, also has new paint, a new ceiling, and will soon get new flooring as well.

And all of this is just the beginning.

Karnatz said the organization is about half way through the first phase of six-phase plan, one that could one day include amenities like enhanced landscaping, more renovations and improvements to the lodging areas, and even a restaurant at Vesper Point overlooking the city.

In all, the organization just wants to see more people taking advantage of one of the city’s most serene, picturesque locations.

“We found in our research that people love Mount Sequoyah. They love knowing it is here, but they didn’t necessarily know you could come up here, and walk around. That it was open space,” Karnatz said. “That is one of the things we need to communicate with people. That you can come up here and enjoy it.

“We want to be a community resource for NWA and for Fayetteville,” she said.


This article is sponsored by First Security Bank. For more great stories of Arkansas food, travel, sports, music and more, visit onlyinark.com.
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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Martin Luther King Jr. Day events planned in Fayetteville]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196116 2019-01-17T15:39:40Z 2019-01-17T15:39:40Z

Flyer file photo

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is Jan. 21, and several events to commemorate the holiday are planned in Fayetteville.

Activities begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 19 with a community service project at the Fayetteville Boys & Girls Club.

On Sunday, Jan. 20, a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Service is planned at St. James Missionary Baptist Church in Fayetteville at 3 p.m. The service will feature speaker Dr. Todd Kitchen, Vice President of Student Affairs at Northwest Arkansas Community College.

Events on Monday, Jan. 21 kick off at 8 a.m. with the MLK Dream Keepers’ Youth Unity Breakfast at the Janelle Y. Hembree Alumni House on Razorback Road, followed by an activity meetup at the HPER Building on the University of Arkansas campus at 9:30 a.m.

The MLK Freedom March begins at 11:15 a.m. at the parking lot on the northeast corner of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Razorback Road. Participants will march to the Student Union on the UA campus for the Noon-Day Vigil at Verizon Ballroom.

At 7 p.m. Monday, the 23rd annual Recommitment Banquet will take place at the Fayetteville Town Center with keynote speaker William “Trey” Smith, a UA student and former Dream Keepers president.

For banquet tickets and more information about holiday events, visit www.nwamlk.org.

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[State transportation department invests $1 million for new UA civil engineering center in Fayetteville]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196027 2019-01-16T15:50:24Z 2019-01-16T15:50:24Z

A conceptual rendering of the new Civil Engineering Research and Education Center.

Courtesy photo

A $1 million investment from the Arkansas Department of Transportation will help build a new Civil Engineering Research and Education Center for the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville.

The new facility will be located at the Arkansas Research and Technology Park off South School Avenue, and will serve as a “living laboratory” for civil engineering undergraduates to gain practical experience while studying at the UA. The center is also expected to benefit researchers and companies across the state.

From the UA:

Students will use the center’s design and construction process to explore topics in construction techniques and management; computer-aided design and drafting; plan development; construction materials; soil mechanics and foundation design; structural steel design and reinforced concrete design. The Civil Engineering Research and Education Center will also provide students with vital opportunities for hands-on experience through laboratory exercises and research activities and will truly be a statewide resource.

“We’re deeply appreciative of ArDOT’s support of our students, staff and faculty through their funding to the Civil Engineering Research and Education Center,” said Micah Hale, professor and head of the Department of Civil Engineering, in a statement. “The center will be a one-of-a-kind facility in Arkansas and in our region, providing students and engineers from across Arkansas an opportunity to conduct cutting-edge research which will have impact at the local, state and national levels.”

Scott Bennett, director of the Arkansas Department of Transportation, said the department’s research at the university began in 1953 and has since led to over 200 projects. He said in recent history, the partnership has resulted in $23 million in investment with an estimated return of $35 million in value.

“As the state’s largest employer of civil engineers, we are looking forward to this new partnership leading to even more success for the U of A, for ArDOT, and ultimately for the citizens who use Arkansas’ transportation system every day,” Bennett said.

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Ruthie Foster to perform in Fayetteville with U of A Inspirational Chorale]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196020 2019-01-17T14:23:44Z 2019-01-16T15:16:26Z

Ruthie Foster / Photo by Riccardo Piccirillo

Award-winning singer-songwriter Ruthie Foster will perform on the University of Arkansas campus at the Jim and Joyce Faulkner Performing Arts Center in late January.

The Austin-based musician will bring her blend of folk, blues, soul, rock and gospel to Fayetteville while accompanied by the U of A Inspirational Chorale at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29. The performance is presented in association with the Walton Arts Center and the 2019 Black Music Symposium Week.

Tickets are $10-$20 and can be purchased at faulkner.uark.edu or by calling the box office at 479-575-5387.

Also, Foster will host two workshops on Wednesday, Jan. 30.

The first, “Evolution of Black Folk Music in the United States,” is scheduled from 1-2 p.m. at the Faulkner Center. Foster will speak about the evolution of Black folk music as a whole, the evolution of her own style, and end with an open Q&A session.

Foster’s second talk, “Finding Your Own Style While Maintaining Integrity of the Roots in Black Folk Music,” is from 5-5:45 p.m. at the Faulkner Center.

Both workshops are free and open to the public.

Foster has performed with Bonnie Raitt, the Allman Brothers and Susan Tedeschi. has been nominated for three Grammys, and has won multiple Blues Music and Austin Music Awards, plus the Grand Prix du Disque from Académie Charles-Cros in France.


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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Smokehouse Players to perform ‘Valentines and Killer Chili’ Feb. 8-9]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196007 2019-01-16T15:16:00Z 2019-01-16T15:08:21Z

Event poster

Local theatre troupe The Smokehouse Players have a new show coming up next month.

The company will perform a one-act play titled Valentines and Killer Chili by playwright Kent Brown, with two performances scheduled the weekend of Feb. 8-9 at the Ozark Mountain Smokehouse.

Here’s the synopsis of the new show.

Directed by Jacob Christiansen, this bare-bones production is filled to the brim with humor and a twist of tears as Jason, a chicken hauler, shares his tender memories of Jackie, a waitress with a beehive hairdo, eyebrows like two McDonalds arches, and green-tinted fingernails, who jokes and flirts with the truckers at Big Tom’s Pit Stop while serving up her famous killer chili, making it easier for them to face the lonely miles ahead.

The Smokehouse Players were formed in 2017 to perform inside Ozark Mountain Smokehouse by locals Terry Vaughan and Tim Gilster.

In addition to the show, actual “killer” regular and veggie chili will be served at the event, along with coleslaw, cobbler with ice cream, and iced tea and coffee. Beer and wine will also be available for purchase.

Advance tickets are required for the show, and the cost is a minimum $20 donation to Magdalene Serenity House, a local organization that helps to “rebuild the lives of women who have experienced trauma, addiction, and incarceration.”

Tickets are available here. Chili will be served at 6:30 p.m., and the show will start at 8 p.m.

For a bit more information, check out the Facebook event.

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Terry J. Wood <![CDATA[Experienced Vols roll over struggling Hogs]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=196008 2019-01-16T15:07:04Z 2019-01-16T15:07:04Z

Tennessee guard Jordan Bone shoots over Isaiah Joe and Ethan Henderson Tuesday night at Thompson-Boling Arena in Knoxville.

Photo: Andrew Ferguson, Tennessee Athletics

If Arkansas Razorback fans needed a reminder of what a very good and possibly great basketball team looked like, they got it Tuesday when the Hogs visited the Tennessee Volunteers.

Coach Rick Barnes’ No. 3 Vols throttled the Razorbacks, 106-97, in a game that was never really a contest.

As they have since mid December, the Razorbacks (10-6, 1-3 SEC) started slow and found themselves down by double digits quickly and an avalanche of Volunteer points didn’t relent until the Vols (15-1, 4-0) held a 55-34 halftime lead.

Next up for the Razorbacks

Who: at Ole Miss
When: 12 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19
Where: Oxford, Mississippi
Watch: SEC Network

Remaining schedule

Jan. 23 – Missouri
Jan. 26 – at Texas Tech
Jan. 29 – Georgia
Feb. 2 – at LSU
Feb. 5 – Vanderbilt
Feb. 9 – at South Carolina
Feb. 12 – at Missouri
Feb. 16 – Mississippi State
Feb. 20 – at Auburn
Feb. 23 – Texas A&M
Feb. 26 – at Kentucky
March 2 – Ole Miss
March 6 – at Vanderbilt
March 9 – Alabama
March 13-17 – SEC Tournament

The Hogs did outscore Tennessee, 53-51, in the second half; however, the only real question of the second half was when and by how much would the Vols break the century mark.

From a glance at the box score, the game wouldn’t appear to be such a blowout.The Vols shot 52.6 percent to the Razorbacks 47.8 percent. Tennessee only outrebounded Arkansas by 1, 34-33. The Vols had 17 turnovers to the Hogs’ 19. Looks like a somewhat close game from those numbers.

However, the garbage factor of the second half skewed the final stats to a degree. All Tennessee needed to do in the second half was avoid a total collapse, and they could coast to an easy win, which is essentially what happened.

The truly telling stats were Arkansas’ first-half shooting percentage of 37.5 percent compared to the Vols’ 50 percent. Tennessee’s defense squeezed the life out of the Razorbacks from the opening tip, forcing four consecutive turnovers at one juncture that allowed the Vols to build an insurmountable lead.

Shooting 52.6 percent from the field is an excellent number for any team, but the Vols also punished Arkansas from the three-point line, nailing 11 of 18 three-pointers for 61.1 percent. Arkansas only connected on 10 of 26 treys for 38.5 percent. That difference loomed large in the lopsided affair.

Like all good teams do, Tennessee made Arkansas pay at the free-throw line, hitting 35 of 39 for 89.7 percent. Arkansas continued to hurt itself at the charity stripe, connecting on just 13 of 22 free throws for 59.1 percent.

Even if the Razorbacks had connected on every one of their free throws, the Vols would have still blown them out. Tennessee was clearly the more talented, more experienced, and, yes, better-coached basketball team. The Vols are without doubt one of the best teams in the nation, and Barnes certainly has them in that conversation for the best.

However, there is no getting around the fact that the Hogs’ poor free-throw shooting is truly crippling their efforts. One could fairly successfully argue that Arkansas’ poor free-throw shooting could be the difference in the Razorbacks making the postseason or not.

If the Razorbacks averaged a very good but still reasonable 70 percent from the free-throw line, the Hogs could very easily be 13-3, 14-2, or even 15-1 at this juncture of the season instead of 10-6.

“Ifs” and “buts,” right.

Free-throw shooting isn’t the Razorbacks’ only issue. Their defense is sketchy against teams that move the ball well, the Hogs have ball flow problems of their own, and the team has a critical gap in talent at the forward spot that can only be rectified through recruiting.

But, free-throw shooting is perhaps the most glaring of the Razorbacks’ weaknesses. It is an issue that has plagued them in nearly every game, and certainly in all of their losses.

Coach Mike Anderson’s free-throw shooting philosophy is very similar to his mentor Nolan Richardson’s. Both say it is “personal.”

What they mean is that the players need to take it upon themselves to improve their free-throw shooting during their own time, if they are not getting enough work on it in practice.

The NCAA only allows players to be on the floor for organized practice and games for 20 hours a week. That time is precious and only a portion of it can be allotted to free-throw shooting. Players that care, work on their free-throw shooting during their own time if that is a deficiency for them.

Generally, the bulk of that work is put in during the off-season. If a player has neglected to put in the time and effort to be a good free-throw shooter before the season starts, he’s probably not going to have the time to totally rectify the problem during the season.

Now, Anderson and Richardson’s philosophy on practicing free-throws isn’t the only one out there. As Richardson was fond of saying, there is more than one way to skin a cat.

There is a management/coaching philosophy that says that you get what you demand.

However, there is a mental aspect to shooting free throws, too. Adding more pressure to the situation, might help one player but destroy another’s confidence. Hence, the personal nature of free-throw shooting.

Since we’re considering some of Richardson’s old sayings, another he was fond of was that some players play to play, but others play to win.

Tennessee is a team that’s playing to win. The Vols didn’t seem cocky, but they were a very confident basketball team. They played with authority, like they were on a mission, and they weren’t going to be deterred.

Daniel Gafford might have been the most talented guy on the floor, but he was far from the best player. A lot of that has to do with experience. The Vols are a very experienced basketball team, and that experience coupled with their talent allows them play at very high level individually and collectively.

The Razorbacks have talent, but other than Gafford, there is no other player on the squad you could project as certain first-round NBA Draft pick.

Even though Gafford has NBA Lottery-like talent, he’s just a sophomore leading a team full of freshmen and sophomores.

Experience makes a difference in college basketball. Tennessee is proof. Teams like Duke and great Kentucky teams of the recent past are exceptions not the rule.

Even with 16 games under its belt, Arkansas remains an inexperienced basketball team that is going to take its lumps in a very competitive SEC basketball conference this year.

However, don’t count the Hogs as totally down and out. Anderson is a tough coach and a good coach whose teams usually play their best basketball from mid-February into March.

The outlook does appear bleak concerning another trip to the NCAA Tournament this year, but like Richardson also use to say, “All sickness isn’t death.”

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Mayor Jordan delivers 2019 state of the city address]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195967 2019-01-16T00:19:16Z 2019-01-16T00:19:16Z

Fayetteville Mayor Lioneld Jordan delivers the state of the city address Tuesday evening inside City Hall.

Photo: Todd Gill, Fayetteville Flyer

Fayetteville Mayor Lioneld Jordan delivered his annual state of the city address before the City Council meeting on Tuesday.

Jordan spoke to the accomplishments of 2018 and where they put the city today, and looked toward what’s to come for Fayetteville.

“This city is forever looking toward the future, never content with where it is, but rather, where it is going to be,” said Jordan. But, he said, “We must always take just a moment to celebrate our successes and thank the community who makes those happen.”

He read a list of thank-yous and reminded the audience of the city’s many awards and recognitions from last year.

For the third year in a row Fayetteville was named one of the top five Best Places to Live by U.S. News and World Report, the Arbor Day Foundation designated Fayetteville as a “Tree City USA Community,” for the 23rd consecutive year, and People for Bikes named Fayetteville as the “Best Place for Bikes” in Arkansas.

He said the Fayetteville Public Library received several awards, all while preparing for an expansion project that will add 82,500 square feet of space by fall 2020. He also mentioned the city’s bike share program, an increase in ridership through transit partners Arkansas Razorback Transit and Ozark Regional Transit, and a recent agreement to develop, construct, and operate Arkansas’s largest solar power system with onsite utility-scale storage at the city’s wastewater treatment facilities.

He called the solar power system “one of the single most strategic decisions ever made” in Fayetteville. The project will move the city toward its steep goal of operating all city facilities completely on renewable clean energy by 2030. The system is expected to be completed this fall, and should raise the rate of clean energy consumption by city facilities to 72 percent.

“While we continue to make strides, we must not rest in the safe zone,” said Jordan, who added that expanding the city’s progressive vision to other areas is vital.

Specific initiatives, he said, include the city’s Digital Inclusion Plan that aims to ensure every resident has affordable access to high-speed internet to participate in education, healthcare, jobs training, and local and national policy discussions.

He also mentioned the Welcoming Plan for international residents and an emerging Workforce Development Plan that will help with wages and housing opportunities for residents.

He said continued efforts of the city’s economic development plan initiatives will build upon recent successes like the $30 million expansions of both the Pinnacle Foods manufacturing and cold-storage facility and Tyson’s Mexican Original plant, the filming of HBO’s True Detective Season 3, and acquisition of Millsaps Mountain for a future trail system that’s expected to host national-level mountain biking events.

In 2019, Fayetteville will welcome the Arkansas Coding Academy, which Jordan said is an affordable alternative-education program that offers fast-paced workforce development solutions for the information technology sector. He said the organization “has a track record of helping populations with barriers obtain gainful employment earning well above a living wage after just three short months of full-time training.”

With the city’s population expected to increase by 50,000 by 2040, Jordan said Fayetteville has a lot of preparation to do. He said the 2020 Census results will directly impact the funding Fayetteville will receive over the next decade and encouraged everyone to stand up and be counted.

Jordan said the city’s comprehensive development plan (City Plan 2030) is being updated to City Plan 2040 to include an infill development scoring matrix, a growth concept map that identifies key growth areas, and a map with new layers of data to aid development decisions.

He said part of that growth preparation is already underway as work continues on Old Wire Road, Highway 112 and Rupple Road. He mentioned the upcoming Old Wire Cycle Track, Niokaska Creek Trail, and several miles of water line and drainage improvements, sewer rehabilitation, pavement overlay and sidewalk work that will continue in 2019.

Other projects include a stormwater study, the 71B Corridor Plan, a master plan for the city’s recycling and trash collection efforts, and a 10-year master plan for parks and recreation.

Jordan said he’s most excited about the proposed 2019 bond initiative, which will send voters to the polls on April 9 for a special election that would renew the city’s 1-cent sales tax that voters approved in 2006.

The 2006 bond program paid for a variety of projects, including the 71B flyover bridge, the widening of Garland Avenue, an extension of Van Asche Drive, and a series of improvements to North College Avenue.

The 2019 bond issue would generate about $226 million to be used for road, drainage, trail and park improvements; economic development; construction of a cultural arts corridor with potential new parking facilities; a new police headquarters; new fire stations; various city facilities improvements; and refinancing outstanding sales tax bonds.

He listed several road projects the initiative would help fund, including completion of the last missing segment of North Rupple Road, as well as improvements to Zion Road, Porter Road, Deane Street, and Sycamore Street, North Street and the Highway 71B corridor. Intersection improvements would include 15th Street and Razorback Road and Millsap Road at College Avenue.

Trail improvements would include completion of the Tsa La Gi Trail, connections to Centennial Park via Shiloh Trail, and an extension of St. Paul Trail to a proposed paddle park at Pump Station Road across the West Fork of the White River, and connecting with neighborhoods east of the river.

The new police facility will include three buildings – one for the main department, one for training with vehicle and evidence storage, and an indoor pistol and rifle firing range.

The bond also includes construction of a cultural arts corridor that’s expected to stimulate economic development in the entertainment district near Dickson Street. Jordan said it will create a community hub for large and small performances and festivals, and called it “a catalyst” for additional shopping and eating in the downtown area.

“This city is and always will be on the cutting edge, pushing the envelope, leading the pack, and making what other places would call impossible our very own version of possible,” said Jordan. “This city never rests and will always be moving down the road of progress to the place we will finally reside which is called the future.”

» Read Mayor Jordan’s full 2019 state of the city address

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Fayetteville City Council recap: Jan. 15, 2019]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195927 2019-01-16T01:05:56Z 2019-01-15T22:11:22Z

File photo

On the agenda…

  • Presentation of the MLK Brotherhood Award
  • The State of the City Address
  • Approving additional repair work at the Meadow Street Parking Deck
  • Repairing equipment at the city’s wastewater treatment facilities
  • Renewing contracts for pay-by-phone and utility locating services
  • An appeal of a rezoning request at 1882 N. Starr Drive.

» Download the full agenda

A meeting of the Fayetteville City Council began at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 inside room 219 of City Hall, located at 113 W. Mountain St. in Fayetteville.

Listed below are the items up for approval and links to PDF documents with detailed information on each item of business.


Roll Call

Present: Sonia Gutierrez, Sarah Marsh, Mark Kinion, Matthew Petty, Mayor Lioneld Jordan, Sloan Scroggin, Sarah Bunch, Teresa Turk, Kyle Smith
Absent: None

» View current attendance records


Mayor’s Announcements, Proclamations and Recognitions

1. Presentation of the City of Fayetteville Martin Luther King Brotherhood Award – Presented by City Attorney Kit Williams to Brian Pugh, the city’s waste reduction coordinator.

Kit Williams presents the award to Brian Pugh, the city’s waste reduction coordinator.


2. State of the City Address – By Mayor Lioneld Jordan (Read the full address)

Jordan delivers the state of the city address.


City Council Meeting Presentations, Reports and Discussion Items

1. Housing Authority Board Appointment of Ezra Breashears
Pass 7-0

* Scroggin was absent for this vote


Consent

Consent items are approved in a single, all-inclusive vote unless an item is pulled by a council member at the beginning of the meeting.

1. Approval of the Dec. 18, 2018 and Jan. 3, 2019 City Council Meeting Minutes
Pass 8-0

2. Bid #19-15 Holtzclaw Excavating, Inc. (Details): A resolution to award Bid #19-15 and authorize the purchase of waste disposal services for construction debris from Holtzclaw Excavating, Inc. in the amount of $15.00 per load as needed through the end of 2019.
Pass 8-0

3. 2019 Overlay and Sidewalk Projects (Details): A resolution to approve the Transportation Division Overlay and Sidewalk Projects List for 2019.
Pass 8-0

4. MSI Consulting Group, LLC (Details): A resolution to authorize the purchase of annual software maintenance from MSI Consulting Group, LLC for virtual justice software used by the District Court, Police Department and the City Prosecutor Division in the amount of $21,600.00 plus applicable taxes, and to approve a 5% project contingency in the event additional licenses are needed.
Pass 8-0

5. Fayetteville District Court Equipment Upgrades (Details): A resolution to approve a budget adjustment in the amount of $25,000.00 recognizing revenue from the Court Automation Fund for upgrades to the servers, software, computers, and related technology equipment used by the Fayetteville District Court.
Pass 8-0

6. NEOGOV Annual Software Maintenance (Details): A resolution to authorize the purchase of annual software maintenance from GovernmentJobs.com, Inc. d/b/a NEOGOV for the city’s human resources software in the amount of $24,707.03 plus applicable taxes.
Pass 8-0

7. Walker Family Residential Community Complex (Details): A resolution to approve a contract with Seven Hills Homeless Center to provide funding assistance in the amount of $57,000.00 for maintenance and repairs at the Walker Family Residential Community Complex in 2019.
Pass 8-0

8. Something Different, LLC (Details): A resolution to authorize a 10-month contract with Something Different, LLC, with automatic renewals for up to four one-year terms, pursuant to RFP 18-16, to provide for operation of the concession stands at Kessler Mountain Regional Park Soccer Complex, Gary Hampton Softball Complex, Lake Fayetteville Softball Complex, and the Wilson Park Pool.
Pass 8-0

9. Environmental Consulting Operations, Inc. Amendment No. 5 (Details): A resolution to approve Amendment No. 5 to the contract with Environmental Consulting Operations, Inc. in the amount of $66,255.00 for wetlands mitigation site monitoring and management in 2019.
Pass 8-0

10. CH2M Hill Engineers, Inc. (Details): A resolution to approve an amendment to the 2018 contract with CH2M Hill Engineers, Inc. in the amount of $95,339.16 to reconcile costs incurred in overhauling belt filter presses at the Noland and West Side water resource recovery facilities, and to authorize a payment in that amount.
Pass 8-0


Unfinished Business

None


New Business

1. Garver, LLC Amendment No. 1 (Details)

A resolution to approve Amendment No. 1 to the professional engineering services agreement with Garver, LLC in the amount of $80,100.00 for additional design and construction phase services related to the Meadow Street Parking Deck Rehabilitation Project, to approve additional project contingency in the amount of $8,010.00, and to approve a budget adjustment.
Pass 8-0

Background:
The Meadow Street Parking Deck was constructed in the late 1970s in conjunction with the construction of the (then) Hilton Hotel. Restoration work was performed on the deck in 2005, but staff said more recent observations identified several maintenance issues that have developed since then. The work includes replacement of metal stair treads, demolition and complete replacement of both stairs serving the deck, repair and patching of concrete and stucco surfaces, crack repair, painting, and several other items.

Staff said since construction began, some unforeseen conditions have appeared which require more work. This amendment only includes the fees associated with the additional engineering work. Preliminary cost estimates for the actual construction are about $230,000. However, $88,000 worth of work is estimated to be removed from the original plan, resulting in an anticipated net additional construction cost of approximately $142,000. That item will come to the council at a future meeting.

Discussion:
There was no public comment.

Decision:
The resolution was passed by a vote of 8-0.


2. Andritz Separation, Inc. (Details)

An ordinance to waive formal competitive bidding and accept a repair quote of $33,497.00 plus applicable taxes from Andritz Separation, Inc. to repair belt filter presses at the Noland and West Side water resource recovery facilities.
Pass 8-0

Background:
Staff said the equipment is 10-15 years old, and the work is needed to continue daily processing of water and sewer solids.

Discussion:
There was no public comment. Kinion said the item was approved by the council’s Water, Sewer and Solid Waste Committee.

Decision:
The ordinance was advanced through all three readings, and was passed by a vote of 8-0.


3. Ovivo USA, LLC (Details)

An ordinance to waive the requirements of formal competitive bidding and approve the purchase of two macerator pumps for the West Side and Noland water resource recovery facilities from Ovivo USA, LLC in the total amount of $47,800.01 plus applicable taxes.
Pass 8-0

Background:
Staff said the equipment has experienced internal failure, leaving the preliminary treatment process without back-up redundancy. The cause of failure is believed to be normal wear.

Discussion:
There was no public comment.

Decision:
The ordinance was advanced through all three readings, and was passed by a vote of 8-0.


4. Arkansas One-Call System, Inc. (Details)

An ordinance to waive competitive bidding through 2022 and approve the purchase of utility locating services for 2019 from Arkansas One-Call System, Inc. in an amount not to exceed $30,000.00.
Pass 8-0

Background:
The company provides utility locating services for the Water & Sewer Department to make sure that city employees don’t damage other utilities while installing lines and taps and performing repairs on the water and sewer system.

Discussion:
There was no public comment. Kinion said the item was approved by the council’s Water, Sewer and Solid Waste Committee.

Decision:
The ordinance was advanced through all three readings, and was passed by a vote of 8-0.


5. PayByPhone Limited (Details)

An ordinance to waive competitive bidding and authorize an extension of the contract for parking payment services with PayByPhone Limited through 2022.
Pass 8-0

Background:
The company provides the software needed to allow customers to pay for parking using mobile web, smartphone, and smartwatch apps. Staff said pay-by-phone transactions has increase by about 300 percent between 2014-2018 which has resulted in an increase in corresponding transaction fees. The fees exceeded $20,000 for the first time, thus requiring City Council approval of this agreement.

Discussion:
There was no public comment.

Decision:
The resolution was passed by a vote of 8-0.


6. Appeal RZN 18-6380 (1882 Starr Road/JB Hayes) (Details)

An ordinance to rezone that property described in rezoning petition RZN 18-6380 for approximately 1.20 acres located at 1882 N. Starr Drive from RSF-4, Residential Single Family, 4 units per acre to NS-L, Neighborhood Services-Limited.
Left on the second reading

Background:
The property was originally used for a commercial office and parking lot on county land before it was annexed into the city. The building and property has consistently been used for commercial purposes since its original development. It is surrounded by residential homes, but city planners are in favor of the requested rezoning, because they said it would not offer the opportunity to develop significantly larger structures that would be out of scale with surrounding homes. The Planning Commission, however, denied the request after five commissioners voted against the application (3 voted in favor and 1 was absent).

Location:

Discussion:
Staff said the property owner plans to develop the remainder of his property as a single-family neighborhood as depicted in the photo below:

Kinion said he’s in support of the request because it’s an established property that’s compatible with the surrounding homes.

Bunch said she’s not heard from anyone who is against the rezoning, and said she believes the requested zoning is a good fit for the property.

Council member Scroggin, who was on the Planning Commission and voted against the request, said he believes the president of the nearby neighborhood association doesn’t know that the denied rezoning request has been appealed to the council, otherwise he would be here tonight to comment. He said the commission’s decision was based upon the potential for further development of the land.

Marsh moved to send the item to the second and third readings. Kinion seconded. The motions passed 8-0.

Turk said she thinks the item should be held on the second reading to allow the public more time to weigh in. Marsh declined to retract her motion.

The motion to move to the third reading failed 2-6 (only Marsh and Kinion voted in favor).

Decision:
The ordinance was left on the second reading. The discussion will continue on Feb. 5.


Announcements

– Two “studio session” meetings are planned to discuss possible design elements for the northern part of the 71B Corridor project. The sessions are scheduled from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday (Jan. 15-16) at Christian Life Cathedral, 1285 E. Millsap Road.
– Payments made to the city this Thursday (Jan. 17) will only be available on a limited basis.
– The mayor’s state of the city address is available on the city’s website (we also have it here).
– Officials will give an update on the progress of the city’s flood management study at one more meeting this month in Fayetteville.


Adjourned

This meeting was adjourned at 7:05 p.m.

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Giveaway: Dorrance Dance, Feb. 12 at Walton Arts Center]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195960 2019-01-15T18:07:48Z 2019-01-15T18:07:48Z

Dorrance Dance / Photo: Murphy Made Photography

The dance company the New York Times called “entirely glorious” is coming to Fayetteville next month.

New York City-based tap dance company, Dorrance Dance, is set to perform at the Walton Arts Center on Tuesday, Feb. 12, and we’ve got a pair of tickets to give away to the show.

From their website:

Dorrance Dance is an award-winning tap dance company based out of New York City. The company’s work aims to honor tap dance’s uniquely beautiful history in a new, dynamic, and compelling context; not by stripping the form of its tradition, but by pushing it – rhythmically, technically, and conceptually.

Tickets to the show range from $35-$85, and are now on sale at Walton Arts Center’s website. Of course, you won’t have to worry about that if you’re the winner of our giveaway. Good luck!

How to enter

We’re starving. Leave a comment telling us your favorite place to get lunch in Fayetteville, and you’re entered.

What you’ll win

One (1) winner chosen at random will win two (2) tickets to see Dorrance Dance on Feb. 12 at the Walton Arts Center.

A few rules (read ‘em carefully):

  • Contest is open until noon on Friday, Jan. 18.
  • This contest is open to anyone anywhere except Fayetteville Flyer writers, Walton Arts Center employees, and their immediate family members.
  • You may only enter this specific contest once.
  • Once notified via a comment on this post, the winner will have 24 hours to respond to claim the prize. Check in on Monday to see if you’ve won.
  • You’ll need to provide us with your first and last name (if you win) and then be prepared to show a valid photo ID when picking up your tickets.

For more information about this performance or to purchase tickets, visit waltonartscenter.org..

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Weekly deals & more: Jan. 14-20, 2018]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195913 2019-01-16T17:44:11Z 2019-01-14T22:57:49Z Weekly deals content comes from our sponsors. For more info, call Dustin at 479-387-1002.

Jumble Hub


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Kingfish


Thirsty? Kingfish has $2 cans every night of the week!


Lucky Luke’s


Wednesdays are for wings. Get delicious smoked wings for just 69¢ every Wednesday at Lucky Luke’s! $1 drafts, too!


Maxine’s Tap Room


Craft cocktails, local brews, and good conversation. Find all of the above at Maxine’s Tap Room.


Mojo’s Pints & Pies


Sundays are FREE delivery day from Mojo’s Pints & Pies! Get delivery for your True Detective watch party!


Ozark Natural Foods


Ozark Natural Foods has cold-pressed juice on sale for $4.99 right now. Also, select vitamins and supplements from their private label are 20% for the month of January!


Penguin Ed’s


One of the best breakfasts in Fayetteville can be found at Penguin Ed’s! Served ever Saturday and Sunday.


Premier Dermatology


Resolve to take care of yourself in 2019. Premier Dermatology can help with all things skin, all year long!


Riffraff


Pullover sweaters, cardigans, chenille, and more. Check out the cozy new arrivals at Riffraff.


Sassy’s Red House


Get a barbecue sandwich and a side for just $6.99 every weekday for lunch at Sassy’s!


Slim Chickens


Planning a big game party? Earn double points on tender and wing platters from Slim Chickens when you order via their app!


Southern Food Company


Southern Food Company is planning some fun events, including a cookie workshop on Feb. 8, and a very special Valentines Day dinner on Feb. 15. Details are on Facebook.


Specialized Real Estate Group


Specialized Real Estate Group has bright new apartments in Fayetteville’s Mill District available, on the trail and right in the middle of everything!


Taziki’s


Taziki’s Mediterranean Cafe makes keeping your New Year’s Resolution easy and delicious.


TheatreSquared


TheatreSquared’s new show Every Brilliant Thing opens this week at Nadine Baum Studios. Get tickets!


UARK Federal Credit Union


Students Loans. Choose the student loan that’s right for you at UARK Federal Credit Union.


Underwood’s


Click here to shop this month’s birthstone, Garnet. Only at Underwoods Fine Jewelers!


Walton Arts Center


Walton Arts Center has great shows coming up, including Go Dog Go, Whose Live Anyway?, Ruthie Foster, and more!


Wasabi


Thursdays are martini night at Wasabi, with amazing martinis for just $5!


Washington Regional Medical Center


Washington Regional Urgent Care clinics are here if you need them this winter. Locations in Fayetteville and Johnson! Learn more.


Adventure Subaru


Adventure Subaru is proud to sponsor fun local events, like Frost Fest, coming up Feb. 2.


Austin Vision Care


The optical center at Austin Vision Care has awesome brands, like State Optical!


Bank of Fayetteville


Earn interest on your checking account with the new Platinum Checking account at Bank of Fayetteville! Click to learn more.


Beavers & Broomfield Family Dentistry


No dental insurance? No problem. Learn more about the awesome dental savings plan from Beavers & Broomfield!


Bordinos


Tenderloin burger, fried shrimp po’ boy, chick pea patty melt, and more. Bordinos has some awesome options for lunch!


Buster Belly’s


Domestic bottles and wells are just $2 daily during happy hour at Buster’s! More specials.


Collier Drug Store


Does your pharmacy deliver? Collier Drug Store offers free delivery every day!


Damgoode Pies


Monday’s are Mule Mondays at Damgoode Pies! Enjoy their signature cocktail for just $4 every week!


Eureka Pizza


Got a lot of folks to feed? Pick up a 3-pizza $19.99 family feast from Eureka Pizza! More pizza deals.


First National Bank of NWA


FNB NWA is proud to welcome new president Tanya Mims and Loan Manager Dave Holland to their team in Fayetteville!


Flyer Homes


New year, new home? Start your search at Flyer-Homes.com!


Flying Burrito Co.


Wanna spice up your event? Flying Burrito can provide a taco bar for groups of 10-500. Call the N. College store at 479-527-0400.


Foghorn’s


Have you tried Foghorn’s happy hour part 2? Monday-Friday from 8-9 p.m., get $2 domestic drafts, $2 well drinks and $2 off all appetizers!


GCM Computers


IT and networking doesn’t have to be a headache. Call the local experts at GCM Computers .


HerHealth Clinic


Baby basics, breastfeeding, childbirth and more. Check out the community classes available in 2019 from HerHealth.


Hugo’s


If you’ve been looking for Basil Haydens 10 year, look no further than Hugo’s! It’s now available at the bar.


JJ’s Grill


You deserve a mid-day break, so make it a good one. Enjoy lunch at any JJ’s Grill or at JBGB.


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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Latest 71B Corridor Plan meetings to focus on uptown Fayetteville area]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195908 2019-01-15T14:54:30Z 2019-01-14T17:47:44Z

Traffic moves along College Avenue just south of the Northwest Arkansas Mall / Photo: Todd Gill, Fayetteville Flyer

The latest round of public meetings to discuss the 71B Corridor Plan will focus on uptown Fayetteville.

Last month’s round of input discussed the southern portion of the plan, but meetings this week will be centered on the northern area between Interstate 49 and College Avenue, including the Northwest Arkansas Mall.

Two “studio session” meetings are planned to discuss possible design elements for the northern part corridor project. The sessions are scheduled from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday (Jan. 15-16) at Christian Life Cathedral, 1285 E. Millsap Road.

From a news release:

These will be highly interactive meetings, giving participants an opportunity to discuss their ideas and draw them on maps with city planners and designers from RDG Planning and Design.

The public is also invited to provide input through an online survey at speakup.fayetteville-ar.gov/71B.


Meeting schedule

Tuesday, Jan. 15 – 5-7 p.m. – Christian Life Cathedral, 1285 E. Millsap Road
Wednesday, Jan. 16 – 5-7 p.m. – Christian Life Cathedral, 1285 E. Millsap Road

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[FYI: Fayetteville bill payments to be limited on Jan. 17]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195904 2019-01-14T15:41:42Z 2019-01-14T15:41:42Z

Fayetteville Flyer file photo

Payments made to the city this Thursday (Jan. 17) will only be available on a limited basis.

That’s because an upgrade to the city’s financial software will require some downtime for the system that accepts payments.

In-person payments will not be accepted after 3 p.m., and web payments will not be accepted between 3-7 p.m.

The limitations are for all city payments, including utility bills, parking tickets, court fines, business licenses, and all other fees or invoices.

Everything should be back up and running on Friday, Jan. 18, according to a news release.

From the release:

This upgrade will update the city’s Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software to the latest version. The new ERP version provides the foundation for future enhancements to utility web payments and centralizing over-the-counter payment processing into a single software application. Both of these future enhancements are part of the Mayor’s commitment to digital infrastructure and improved customer service.

For information on how to make online payments, visit www.fayetteville-ar.gov/951/Business-Payments.

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Fayetteville public meetings: Jan. 14-18]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195897 2019-01-17T15:21:25Z 2019-01-14T15:26:54Z

Staff photo

The following is a list of public meetings obtained from the City of Fayetteville’s website, and through emails or press releases received from city staff.

For questions about any of the following meetings, call the city’s administration office at 479-575-8323.

Monday, Jan. 14, 2019

Time Meeting Location
5:30 p.m. Planning Commission ** (agenda) City Hall, Room 219

Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019

Time Meeting Location
5:30 p.m. City Council Meeting ** (agenda) City Hall, Room 219

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019

Time Meeting Location
9 a.m. Technical Plat Review (agenda) City Hall, Room 326
5 p.m. Washington County Regional Ambulance
Authority Executive Committee
Station 1

Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019

Time Meeting Location
9 a.m. Subdivision Committee * (agenda) City Hall, Room 326
2 p.m. Airport Board Airport Conference Room
3 p.m. Policemen’s Pension and Relief Board of Trustees * City Hall, Room 326
4 p.m. Fayetteville Public Library Board of Trustees (agenda) Public Library, Henry Room
5:30 p.m Telecommunications Board *Cancelled, no agenda items City Hall, Room 326
5:30 p.m. Public Facilities Board * City Hall, Room 111

Friday, Jan. 18, 2019

Time Meeting Location
  No meetings listed  

* To be shown later on the Fayetteville Government Channel
** To be televised live on the Fayetteville Government Channel

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Save the date for these fun events and festivals coming up in and around Fayetteville this Spring]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195847 2019-01-15T22:33:54Z 2019-01-11T18:01:53Z

Frost Fest / Courtesy photo

It is January, which for us, always has us looking forward a little bit to the warmer days ahead this time of year.

To the days when the grass is greener, and the trees are in bloom, and when everything is a little less…brown.

Along those lines, here’s a list of fun food, drink, film, and other types of festivals coming up in the next several months to look forward to and to help keep our spirits up in these dog days of winter.


Frost Fest

When: Feb. 2
Where: 2463 N McConnell Ave (next to the Washington County Fairgrounds)
What: Fossil Cove’s annual Winter craft beer festival is returning for a fourth year this winter.

The event features dozens of breweries from Arkansas and the surrounding region sampling their craft brews, and was attended by more than 2,500 folks in 2018.

Frost Fest debuted in 2016, and became a hit with beer lovers due to its practice of bringing in brewers and representatives from the actual participating breweries (as opposed to volunteers) to pour the beer and interact with festival attendees.

In addition to the beer, the festival will include food from local food trucks, live music by Monk Is King, Vintage Pistol and Groovement, and other festivities.

Tickets are $60, and include a sampling glass, plus all the samples you can drink. Beer Enthusiast tickets are also available for $70, and include early access to the festival, a larger sampling glass, and a few other perks.

A portion of the proceeds from the event will benefit Apple Seeds, Inc.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit frostfest2019.eventbrite.com, or visit the Fossil Cove tasting room, located at 1946 N Birch Ave. in Fayetteville.


Chilirhea

When: Feb. 16
Where: Washington County Fairgrounds
What: The local chili cook off and fundraiser for Alzheimers Arkansas with a kinda gross-sounding name is back for a 14th year in 2019.

Chilirhea is set for Saturday, Feb. 16 this year. The event, which began in 2004 as a way for close friends to reunite after college has grown into a huge annual fundraising event for Alzheimer’s-related causes in the state of Arkansas. The event has raised more than $450,000 since its inception for Alzheimer’s Arkansas, UAMS Reynolds Institute on Aging, and the Broyles Academy. Last year alone, they raised more than $107,000 (their largest amount yet).

Tickets to the event are $35-40, on sale now at chilirhea.com.


Nutty Runner

When: March 16
Where: Columbus House Brewery
What: Featuring its namesake beer at every mile, this 5K race caters to those that want the chance to exercise outdoors, enjoy craft beer, and give back to a local nonprofit all at the same time.

Starting and finishing at Columbus House Brewery, this 5K course will weave through Fayetteville’s historic downtown and Wilson Park neighborhood.

Cost to participate is $40, and that price will go up on Jan. 15. For more info, visit the event website.


Fayetteville Gumbo Cookoff

When: March 16
Where: Washington County Fairgrounds
What: The folks behind the popular Fayetteville Foam Fest and Ales & Tails festivals are bringing back their annual Gumbo Cookoff event for a fourth year this spring.

The event will feature several teams creating their best batch of the classic New Orleans dish. In addition, there will be live music, and local craft beer available.

Proceeds from the event will benefit the Lib Horne Fayetteville Animal Shelter, The Ranger’s Pantry Pet Food Bank & The Washington County Humane Society.


Wizard Way of the Ozarks

When: March 23-24
Where: Fayetteville Town Center
What: The unofficial fan convention dedicated to your favorite world of witchcraft and wizardry that debuted in Fayetteville last year will return with a new name in 2019.

Wizard Way of the Ozarks (formerly DiaCON Alley of the Ozakrs) is set for March 23-24, 2018 at the Fayetteville Town Center.

The event will include a host of activities related to the classic books by J.K. Rowling, including panel discussions, a sorting hat, a scavenger hunt, raffles, photo ops, headmasters army recruitment, costume contest, an escape room and lots more.

The event, which sold out pretty quickly last year, has expanded to include two days of fun this year.

Wizard Way of the Ozarks / Courtesy


Beer and Bagel Run

When: March 23
Where: Hazel Valley Ranch
What: The Beer and Bagel Run is a 4(ish) mile fun run and party featuring local craft beer, bagels, tailgate games, and other festivities.


Hogeye Marathon

When: April 6
Where: Springdale, AR
What: The annual Hogeye Marathon includes a full marathon, a half marathon, a 5k run, and other festivities.

The races make their way through Springdale, with a start and finish in the downtown area on Emma Avenue.


Joe Martin Stage Race

When: April 4-7
Where: Downtown Fayetteville
What: The Joe Martin Stage Race is a 4-day, 4-stage professional men and women’s cycling race along with a 2-day, 2-stage amateur stage race held in early spring each year in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

2018 will mark the 41st anniversary of the amateur races; 16th anniversary on the USA Cycling Pro Racing Tour (PRT) and 4th year to be on the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) America Tour calendar.

The Joe Martin Stage Race is part of both the USAC Pro Racing Tour (PRT) which is the pro and elite amateur cycling tour of USA Cycling and the UCI America Tour.

Over 750 athletes and teams from 27 countries and all 50 states will be attending the race.


Ales & Tails – Fayetteville

When: April 6
Where: Washington County Fairgrounds
What: Ales & Tails is a boiled crawfish and craft beer festival that started a couple years ago in Fayetteville.

In addition to thousands of pounds of boiled crawfish, the event will feature live music, and as beer by local and regional craft breweries.

The event is also a benefit for the Lib Horne Fayetteville Animal Shelter, The Ranger’s Pantry Pet Food Bank & The Washington County Humane Society.

More details about this year’s event will be released in the coming weeks at alesandtails.org.


Cow Paddy Run

When: April 13
Where: Gulley Park
What: The 2019 Cow Paddy Run is set for Saturday, April 13 at Gulley Park in Fayetteville.

The annual event, which includes a 5K race and a 1K Fun Run, is hosted by The Spark Foundation and supports health and fitness education in local schools while providing funds for the Fayetteville Public Education Foundation.

Local schools receive prize money for having the highest overall participation rate for students, families, teachers and alumni. This year both elementary and middle schools are eligible for cash prizes. The school with the most participation will receive $2,500, second place will get $1,000 and third place will receive $500.

Cow Paddy Run / Courtesy


Ales & Tails – Bentonville

When: Saturday, April 13
Where: 8th Street Market
What: In addition to the Fayetteville event, a second Ales & Tails event is also in the works in Bentonville this year.

Ales & Tales north will feature a lot of the same features of the Fayetteville event, including music, local brews, and of course, plenty of tasty, tasty crawdaddies.

More info will be released soon at alesandtails.org.


Springtime of Youth Festival

When: April 27
Where: Washington County Fairgrounds
What: The University of Arkansas’ Headliners Concert Committee recently announced that their Springtime of Youth music festival will return for a fifth year.

The event debuted in 2015, and was introduced as an alternative to of the once-per-semester concerts held in the past at Barnhill Arena.

The lineup for the event will likely be released sometime in March. Past performers include Diplo, Børns, Wiz Khalifa, Mutemath, MisterWives, Moon Taxi, Big Sean, and Young the Giant.


Fayetteville Yoga Fest

When: May 3-5
Where: Mount Sequoyah
What: A three-day yoga festival is coming up in May.

The event, called Fayetteville Yoga Fest, is set for May 3-5 on Mount Sequoyah, and is “a celebration of movement, music, and mindful living.”

The event will feature more than 60 indoor and outdoor yoga classes, meditation classes, live music, group hikes, and more.

More info is available at their website.


Arkansas Brewgrass Festival

When: Saturday, May 4
Where: Washington County Fairgrounds
What: The Arkansas Brewers Guild’s annual craft beer and bluegrass festival is set to return to Fayetteville this spring.

The event will include local and regional bluegrass music, local arts & crafts, and of course, plenty of Arkansas craft beer as well.

It’s set to be a family-friendly event with plenty of activities for the kids. There will also be a market featuring handmade items from local makers and artists.

The music lineup this year is expected to be announced very soon.

A full lineup of participating breweries, ticket info, and more will also be announced at a later date.


Fayetteville Foam Fest

When: May 4
Where: Fayetteville Downtown square
What: The largest of Fayetteville beer festivals will return for year eight in 2019.

The event was the first local beer festival of its kind in Fayetteville, and is set for Saturday, May 4 on the Fayetteville square this year.

Fayetteville Foam Festival always includes live music, local food trucks, and of course, hundreds of craft beers from craft breweries from all over. A VIP experience at the event includes heavy hors d’oevres, and local homebrew from local club, FLOPS (Fayetteville Lovers of Pure Suds).

Proceeds from the event will benefit the Lib Horn Animal Shelter, Ranger’s Pantry, and the Breakaway Cycling Team.


Springtime of Youth Festival / Courtesy, UA Headliners Committee

Bentonville Film Festival

When: May 7-11
Where: Downtown Bentonville
What: Bentonville Film Festival is set to return to Downtown Bentonville once again this spring.

The event, created by movie star Geena Davis and sponsored by Walmart, is set for May 7-11 at various locations around downtown Bentonville.

The week-long event will feature film screenings, panel discussions, and other events. The festival was created to celebrate diversity in films, and is entering its fifth year in 2019.


Art of Wine

When: May 16-17
Where: Walton Arts Center
What: The annual Art of Wine Festival at Walton Arts Center is moving up a month this year.

Due to conflicts with the regular early/mid June dates, the event is set for May 16-17 in 2019.

The event kicks off with the annual Winemaker’s Dinner on May 16, featuring a six course meal, E&J Gall Wines, silent and live auctions, and more. Tickets to the event are $225.

The Uncorked wine tasting event and party is on May 14, featuring an assortment of wine, beer, and spirits from local restaurants, live music, and more. Tickets are around $75, though some early bird tickets are available now for $60.


This article is sponsored by First Security Bank. For more great stories of Arkansas food, travel, sports, music and more, visit onlyinark.com.
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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Torchy’s Tacos plans Fayetteville location]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195874 2019-01-11T16:36:21Z 2019-01-11T16:33:57Z

 

Torchy’s Tacos will soon open a location in Fayetteville.

The Austin-based chain this week received state health department approval for a new restaurant on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard next to Andy’s Frozen Custard.

Company officials did not respond to a request for confirmation of the new restaurant, but an update to the Torchy’s website today included Fayetteville as an upcoming location at 1561 W. MLK Jr. Blvd.

Launched from a food truck in Austin in 2006, Torchy’s Tacos has grown to include over 60 locations across Texas, Oklahoma and Colorado. Their menu features 15 unique lunch and dinner menu tacos, 11 breakfast menu tacos, and a variety of sides. Business Insider last month named Torchy’s the best chain in America.

The company is known for giving back to the communities where it does business. Each month a portion of the proceeds from the sale of each Taco of the Month are donated to charitable partners. The January Taco of the Month is “Trailer Park Hillbilly Style,” which includes hand-battered fried chicken, chorizo, chopped bacon, green chiles, green chile queso, freshly grated cheddar jack cheese and pico de gallo with poblano sauce on a flour tortilla. Charitable partners for January include Make-A-Wish, MD Anderson, and Phoenix House.

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Weekend Flyer: Hot Club of San Francisco, White Mansion, Dylan Earl, Randall Shreve, and more]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=195851 2019-01-11T16:04:57Z 2019-01-11T16:04:57Z

Friday, Jan. 11

White Mansion / Courtesy

One of the hottest hot clubs in the country will be at Walton Arts Center Friday night. Hot Club of San Fransisco will perform their second of two shows at the venue, with their “Swing Dance Party.” Tickets are just $10, available here. They played a different set Thursday night as well, and we heard it was rad.

There’s a big show at George’s Friday night as well, with local bands Modeling, White Manson, and Tyler Tradewell. Tickets are $8 at the door.

Also in tunes, Oklahoma musician and frequent Fayetteville visitor Mike Hosty will be in town for a show at Smoke & Barrel Friday night. He’s doing a cool one-man band thing these days called simply Hosty.


Full list:

8:00 am

Art show: Boston Mountain Potters Association

Bank of Fayetteville
Art
9:00 am

Meditation workshop

Fayetteville Public Library
Community
6:00 pm

Ultra Suede

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
7:00 pm

Hot Club of San Francisco: Swing Dance Party

Walton Arts Center
Activity
7:30 pm

Dirty Flannel Shirt

JJ’s Grill – Springdale
Music
8:00 pm

Mindless Souls

Black Apple Crossing – Springdale
Music
8:00 pm

Rachel B & Table for 3

Mojo’s Pints & Pies
Music
8:00 pm

Southtown Comedy Night: Patrick Cunningham & Duell Aldridge

Nomads
Comedy
8:30 pm

412 West

JJ’s Grill on Dickson
Music
8:30 pm

The Atlantics

JJ’s Grill on Steamboat
Music
9:00 pm

Press Start: Meesh and Nepos

Axis Lounge
Music
10:00 pm

Hosty

Smoke & Barrel Tavern
Music
10:00 pm

Modeling / White Mansion / Tyler Tradewell

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music

 

Saturday, Jan. 12

Dylan Earl / Photo: Robbie Brindley

The Shared Experiences art exhibit featuring work by local African American artists we wrote about earlier this week is happening on Saturday night at Artist’s Laboratory Theatre. Here’s more information about that.

How about some Improv? Local troupe Phunbags is back in action Saturday night at Stage 18.

Music-wise, there is a cool show at Smoke & Barrel with Nashville indie-pop band, Whoa Dakota and local country act, Dylan Earl. This one has a $5 cover.

Also in tunes, Randall Shreve & The Devilles are playing George’s for the first time in a while on Saturday night as well. Tickets are $12-15.

There’s a lot more below. Click around for details. Have an awesome weekend, everyone.


Full list:

11:00 am

Free healthy cooking class

Ozark Natural Foods
Community
2:00 pm

Bartender’s Ball

Nomads
Activity
2:00 pm

Film noir series with Benjamin Meade: The Woman in the Window

Fayetteville Public Library
Community
4:00 pm

Life Styles Art Reception

Nomads
Community
5:00 pm

Arkansas men’s basketball vs. LSU

Bud Walton Arena
Sports
6:00 pm

Shared Experiences: A Black Art Exhibit

Artist’s Laboratory Theatre
Art
7:30 pm

Maud Crawford

JJ’s Grill – Springdale
Music
7:30 pm

Tater, Mater and Squarsh

Core Public House – Mall Avenue
Music
8:00 pm

Ciderday Night Comedy Show: Patrick Cunningham & Duell Aldridge

Black Apple Crossing – Springdale
Comedy
8:00 pm

Monk is King

Nomads
Music
8:00 pm

Phunbags Comedy Improv

Stage 18
Comedy
8:00 pm

The Dirty Few / Gardensnakesss / Hayden’s Haunted Honkey Tonk

Backspace
Music
8:30 pm

After Party Allstars

JJ’s Grill on Dickson
Music
8:30 pm

Jamie Wolfe & the Wranglers

JJ’s Grill on Steamboat
Music
9:00 pm

Randall Shreve and the Devilles

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
10:00 pm

Whoa Dakota / Dylan Earl

Smoke & Barrel Tavern
Music

 

Sunday, Jan. 13

Full list:

12:00 pm

School Of Rock Fayetteville

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
1:30 pm

Experience Fayetteville road bike group ride

Columbus House Brewery
Activity
2:00 pm

Arkansas women’s basketball vs. Vanderbilt

Bud Walton Arena
Sports
2:00 pm

Celebrating Linda Sheets

Art Ventures NWA
Community
2:00 pm

The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Other Eric Carle Favorites

Walton Arts Center
Family
4:00 pm

Silent Sunday: Sunrise, a Song of Two Humans

Black Apple Crossing – Springdale
Community
7:00 pm

Open Mouth Presents: Zachary Crow & Tara Mae Mulroy

Stage 18
Performance
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