Fayetteville Flyer News, Art & Life in Fayetteville, Arkansas 2018-09-21T16:18:42Z https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/feed/atom/ Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Weekend Flyer: Fayetteville Film Fest, Froggy Fresh, Hispanic Heritage Festival, and more]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190804 2018-09-21T16:18:42Z 2018-09-21T16:15:22Z

Friday, Sept. 21

Daniel Campbell’s film “Antiquities” will be screened Friday at Fayetteville Film Festival

The Fayetteville Film Festival is celebrating their 10th year this year, and there are screenings, workshops, and more scheduled throughout the weekend. Among the films on Friday’s schedule is Antiquities, the film created in Arkansas by filmmaker Daniel Campbell. That one is playing on Friday at 8 p.m. at the Global Campus Theatre. Here’s more about that film, and here’s the full Fayetteville Film Fest schedule.

It’s the last weekend to check out TheatreSquared’s version of Once at Nadine Baum Studios. Several of this weekend’s shows are already sold out, so better get your tickets, pronto.

Music-wise, Mountain Sprout is back in town for a show at George’s, and former Wings guitarist and songwriter Laurence Juber will perform at Sunrise Stage (next to Sunrise Guitars).


Full list:

2:00 pm

Fayetteville Film Fest

UA Global Campus
Art
5:30 pm

Fayetteville Film Fest

Stage 18
Art
6:00 pm

Eric Miller

Sassafras Springs Vineyard
Music
6:00 pm

Leah & The Mojo Doctors

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
7:00 pm

Lukas Wigington

Foghorn’s – Springdale
Music
7:00 pm

Pat Ryan Key

Foghorn’s on 15th
Music
7:00 pm

PTR

Foghorn’s on Green Acres
Music
7:30 pm

Laurence Juber

Sunrise Guitars
Music
7:30 pm

TheatreSquared: Once

Nadine Baum Studios
Performance
8:00 pm

Ashtyn Barbaree

Dickson Street Pub
Music
8:00 pm

Comedian Taylor Tomlinson

UA campus
Comedy
8:00 pm

Foggy Bobcat

Black Apple Crossing – Springdale
Music
8:00 pm

Zukerman Trio

Walton Arts Center
Performance
8:30 pm

Jamie Wolfe & the Wranglers

JJ’s on Dickson
Music
8:30 pm

Ragland

JJ’s on Steamboat
Music
9:30 pm

Mountain Sprout

George’s Majestic Lounge
Music
10:00 pm

Mirror Fields / Space4Lease

Smoke & Barrel Tavern
Music

 

Saturday, Sept. 22

Froggy Fresh

Ozark Natural Foods’ annual Tour de Farms event is happening on Saturday morning. Here’s more info about that.

It’s Mom’s night out at Walton Arts Center. Comedians Shayna Ferm and Tracey Tee will bring their Pump & Dump Show to the venue for a 7 p.m. performance on Saturday night. Here’s more about the show.

Why’s James crying? If you don’t already know, you can find out at the Froggy Fresh show at Nomad’s on Saturday night. Look up some of his YouTube videos if you aren’t familiar.

Also in tunes, locals Dylan Earl and Dazz and Brie are at Smoke & Barrel, and Backspace has three band bill with with On the Water, Whoopsi and Jess Harp & the Harpbreakers.

Full list:

7:00 am

Saturday Farmers’ Market

Fayetteville Square
Community
8:00 am

5th Annual Tour de Farms

Ozark Natural Foods
Community
8:00 am

Stormwater Study – Community Input Event

Fayetteville Square
Community
9:00 am

Friends of Fayetteville Public Library Book Sale

Fayetteville Public Library
Community
10:00 am

Fayetteville Film Fest

Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History
Art
10:30 am

Family concert: Brady Rymer

Fayetteville Public Library
Family
1:00 pm

Introduction to Genealogy.

Fayetteville Public Library
Community
1:30 pm

Fayetteville Film Fest

UA Global Campus
Art
2:00 pm

TheatreSquared: Once

Nadine Baum Studios
Performance
6:00 pm

Caleb Lee

Sassafras Springs Vineyard
Music
7:00 pm

East 16 Band

American Legion
Music
7:00 pm

The Pump and Dump Show

Walton Arts Center
Comedy
7:30 pm

Africa in the Ozarks

Arts Center of the Ozarks – Springdale
Community
7:30 pm

Alan Jackson / Randy Houser

The AMP – Rogers
Music
7:30 pm

TheatreSquared: Once

Nadine Baum Studios
Performance
8:00 pm

Ciderday Night Comedy Show: Jay Jackson

Black Apple Crossing – Springdale
Comedy
8:00 pm

Cody Jones and Dan Conklin

Dickson Street Pub
Music
8:00 pm

Froggy Fresh & Money Maker Mike

Nomads
Music
8:00 pm

Odd Key Party

The Odd Soul – Springdale
Music
8:30 pm

Filthy Habit

JJ’s on Steamboat
Music
8:30 pm

Maud Crawford

JJ’s on Dickson
Music
9:00 pm

On the Water / Whoopsi / Jess Harp & the Harpbreakers

Backspace
Music
10:00 pm

Dylan Earl / Dazz and Brie

Smoke & Barrel Tavern
Music

 

Sunday, Sept. 23

There’s a benefit for the local homeless shelter on Sunday. The event, called 7 Hills Shelter Jam, will feature performances by The Ozark Howlers, Los Peos, Brave Heart (formerly Bigguns) and The Cate Brothers at George’s. Admission is $25, and all of the proceeds go to 7 Hills.

Also on Sunday, the annual Hispanic Heritage Festival will take place on the Fayetteville square. It’s a free event, and will include cultural booths, arts, health fair, games, kids area, food, parade, music, dance, and other activities. Here’s a bit more info.

Full list:

1:00 pm

7 Hills Shelter Jam

George’s Majestic Lounge
Fundraiser
1:00 pm

Bobby Smith

Terra Studios
Music
1:00 pm

NWA Hispanic Heritage Festival

Fayetteville Square
Community
1:00 pm

Razorback Volleyball vs Missouri

Barnhill Arena
Sports
2:00 pm

TheatreSquared: Once

Nadine Baum Studios
Performance
8:00 pm

Comedians NWA present: Olivia Grace

Stage 18
Comedy
9:00 pm

Kelly Hunt / John Charles

Backspace
Music
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Kevin Kinder <![CDATA[Looking inside and outside Bikes, Blues & BBQ as it returns for 18th year]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190769 2018-09-21T15:10:27Z 2018-09-21T15:10:27Z

Todd Gill, Fayetteville Flyer

Unless you are brand new to town, you probably know all about Bikes, Blues & BBQ. Or, at minimum, you’ve heard the rumble of Bikes, Blues & BBQ, the massive rally that fills area hotel rooms and Dickson Street with motorcycle enthusiasts. It returns this year on Sept. 26 (a Wednesday) and rumbles along the rest of the weekend, with events officially ending around midnight Sept. 30.

There’s a real split opinion regarding the event. It’s obviously loved by many – it wouldn’t draw so many visitors year after year otherwise. It’s not quite as loved by many locals, who complain about the noise and the traffic congestion that comes with it. Some local businesses will close for the weekend.

In the spirit of this dichotomy, what follows is a list of things you could do at the rally, or things you could do somewhere else. Whether you stay in town or get out, here’s a guide:


If you want to see some animals…

At BB&BBQ:

Photo by Casey Crocker

For the first time, a bull-riding event is coming to BB&BBQ. AMPED UP Production’s Pro Bull Riding Event comes to the Washington County Fairgrounds. The event begins at 7 p.m. Thursday and is free to attend.

Somewhere else:

Reports from Boxley Valley indicate that the elk that roam the Buffalo National River area in the north-central part of the state have entered their rut, or mating season. It’s a good time to view Arkansas’ elk herd because they are active, and it’s the time of year to hear the forest-piercing elk bugle. You can learn more about Arkansas’ elk herd via the Ponca Elk Education Center.


If you want to watch some music…

At BB&BBQ:

BB&BBQ will bring in live music for each of its nights, with the first act going on stage at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Dickson Street Mainstage area at the southwest corner of Dickson Street and West Avenue in Fayetteville. Mainstage headliners include The Squarshers on Wednesday; The Mixtapes on Thursday; Jason D. Williams on Friday; and Dead Metal Society on Saturday. There’s also official BB&BBQ music at the Washington County Fairgrounds. And Dickson Street venues such as George’s Majestic Lounge get in on the action. Headlining the events at George’s is Phillip H. Anselmo (the lead singer of Pantera) and his band The Illegals.

Somewhere else:

Bluegrass and BBQ takes place Friday and Saturday night at The Farm, which is located near Eureka Springs. It features food trucks serving barbecue and several bluegrass bands. Guests can watch Opal Agafia and the Sweet Nothings and the Grateful Bluegrass Boys, a band including members of Hot Buttered Rum and the David Grisman Band. Tickets for the music and camping festival are $55 for the weekend or $30 for one day.


If you want to view loud vehicles…

At BB&BBQ:

Photo: Todd Gill

This is an easy one. They will be everywhere. A higher-than-average concentration will roll around during the annual Parade of Power, which will depart from the Fairgrounds at 3 p.m. and cut a path through Fayetteville that also includes Dickson Street.

Somewhere else:

The organizers of the annual Demolition Derby event in Springdale must be betting that riders will make the short drive to Parson Stadium for another loud event. A series of cars will smash together, with the driver of the last vehicle still operating claiming a cash prize. Tickets for the derby, which begins at 7:30 p.m., are $12 for adults and $7 for children 12 and younger.


If you want to buy something to remind you of Fayetteville…

At BB&BBQ:

Any of the vendors on Dickson Street will sell you a shirt that says Bikes, Blues & BBQ and Fayetteville, Arkansas on it. The official BB&BBQ merch booths sell the official shirts. Many other unofficial vendors will sell you a shirt that says “Fayetteville Arkansas Motorcycle Rally” or some variant because they can’t use the actual name.

Somewhere else:

If you venture up to the Fayetteville Farmers’ Market, you’ll discover two concurrent truths: Bikers typically avoid the Square (instead focusing on Dickson Street) and they aren’t always awake early enough to crowd the streets at 9 a.m. Local artisans will still sell produce and gifts. Several – but not all – of the downtown stores will be open (but you might check with your favorite before venturing out). Downtown businesses typically don’t get much foot traffic during BB&BBQ, so they’d love to have your support over the weekend. Some might even offer sale pricing to sweeten the deal.


If you want to eat…

At BB&BBQ:

Photo: Clayton Taylor

A series of food vendors will convene around the mainstage area, offering a selection of fried foods like those you might find at the county fair. The barbecue element of BB&BBQ takes place beginning at 6:30 p.m. Friday night at the Washington County Fairgrounds. The Peoples’ Choice portion of the Arkansas State Barbeque competition allows patrons to sample the food cooked by the competition chefs the night before their main event. Tasting kits, which provide a way to collect samples from the various barbecue chefs, are $12. The state championship begins the next day but does not include a public sampling.

Also, a new event takes place Saturday at the Fairgrounds. The Steak Feed takes place from 5:30-8 p.m. Ticket buyers will get a steak dinner that includes a 10-oz. ribeye steak, two side dishes and a dessert. Tickets are $24.

Somewhere else:

It’s going to be hard to find a spot at your favorite Dickson Street restaurant. And even if there was a table, parking comes at a premium around Dickson, so it’s going to be tough. Instead, how about heading toward the Square for a meal? Here’s the way to attempt it. Approach the Square from the south (School Avenue, then east on Mountain Street is probably the easiest route). Then, dive into the parking at the Fayetteville Town Center and walk toward your restaurant of choice. It will likely be busy, but not the kind of busy that discourages you from finding a place.


This article is sponsored by First Security Bank. For more great stories of Arkansas food, travel, sports, music and more, visit onlyinark.com.
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Terry J. Wood <![CDATA[Showing improvement Razorbacks’ goal against Auburn]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190800 2018-09-21T15:10:22Z 2018-09-21T15:10:22Z

Photo: ArkansasRazorbacks.com

I’m afraid Saturday’s going to be a tough one for the Arkansas Razorbacks.

In fact, the next month is going to be taxing on the Hogs and their fans.

Arkansas (1-2) faces No. 9 Auburn (2-1) at 6:30 p.m. Saturday in an SEC Network-televised game in which the Hogs are four-touchdown underdogs or more.

As you no doubt know, Arkansas then faces No. 22 Texas A&M at Arlington, No. 1 Alabama in Fayetteville, and then Ole Miss in Little Rock in succession.

Next up for the Razorbacks

Opponent: at Auburn
When: 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22
Where: Auburn, Alabama
TV: SEC Network

Remaining Schedule

Sept. 29 – Texas A&M at Dallas
Oct. 6 – Alabama
Oct. 13 – Ole Miss at Little Rock
Oct. 20 – Tulsa
Oct. 27 – Vanderbilt
Nov. 10 – LSU
Nov. 17 – at Mississippi State
Nov. 23 – at Missouri

There is no real daylight in Arkansas’ schedule until Oct. 20 when the Hogs play Tulsa in Fayetteville in the eighth game of the season.

We all like to think anything can happen in college football, but based on the way the Razorbacks have played through the first fourth of the season, there is no way the Razorbacks are going to pull off an upset. Most of you are probably laughing at me for even mentioning the possibility.

So, how as a Razorback do you get up for this ballgame and try to enjoy the three and a half to four hours you’re going to spend watching it?

If you are waiting for an answer from me, I don’t have one. I was hoping you might have some ideas.

I had a longtime, knowledgeable fellow Razorback fan tell me this week that he had seen some tough times since he began following the Razorbacks as a boy in the 1960s, but that he had never felt like Arkansas was a “third-world program” before like he does now after back-to-back losses to Colorado State and North Texas.

I heard another person joke that maybe the Hogs should adjust their name to the Northwest Arkansas Razorbacks. He surmised if the Razorbacks were going to play like a directional school, they might as well be called one.

Over-the-top Fox radio personality Clay Travis, who loves to kick programs and their fans when they are down, opined that the Razorbacks are so bad that the SEC should kick them out of the league or at least sanction the Hogs with standards they need to meet to stay in the league.

It was bad in the 1990s when the Hogs were losing to Memphis and SMU on a regular basis, but unless we see some rather drastic improvement by the Razorbacks, particularly on the offensive side of the football, the next month and perhaps the rest of the season is going to be tantamount to torture for Hog fans.

The Razorbacks have too many issues on offense to believe first-year coach Chad Morris and his staff can turn things around in just a week. However, there can be improvement. That’s what I’m looking for out of the Hogs Saturday night.

It’s good that left offensive tackle Colton Jackson is supposedly returning to the starting lineup. We’ll see if the reported move of Hjalte Forholdt back to guard and shuffling Ty Clary to center will make a difference. Hopefully they will perform well enough as a group with right tackle Brian Wallace and right guard Johnny Gibson that Arkansas can establish a consistent starting lineup. That’s the only way they can learn to play as a unit. Maybe then we can see some improvement in the running game.

Any improvement in the running game will make the passing game better and the team as a whole more confident.

Last week, it was troubling to watch how out of sync quarterback Cole Kelley was with his receivers. There were some major malfunctions. The easy thing is to lay it all off on the quarterback position.

Morris said on Monday that the offense would be simplified to the point where the Hogs would be able to execute the plays they do elect to run. That would be nice to see, but even very good offenses are going to have trouble executing against a front seven like Auburn’s.

As for quarterback, Morris doesn’t have a good option, but at the moment Ty Storey is his best.
Storey does not have a major-college arm, but he does understand and execute the offense better than Kelley.

Some want to see one of the freshmen start. Last week offensive coordinator Joe Craddock said Connor Noland was the third-teamer. At some point this season, Noland might end up being the starter, but now is not the time. He needs more in-game grooming before being thrust into a starting role if that ever is to happen.

However, if this game gets out of hand, Morris should definitely get him some playing time to help continue judge if it would be better to redshirt him or possibly play him more this season.

On the defensive side of the football, the search continues for a cornerback to hold his own opposite Ryan Pulley. Otherwise, the defense has played decently or at least better than the last two years when not put in bad situations by turnovers and the offense’s overall ineffectiveness.

That said, Arkansas has yet to play a team anywhere close to as talented as Auburn, and Tiger quarterback Jarrett Stidham has to be eager to get a shot at the Razorbacks. Maybe he’ll be overeager and make some mistakes?

To sum it up, my expectations for Saturday certainly isn’t a victory, but it would be good to see some improvement by the Razorbacks.

The rumor is that Morris is taking a more hands-on approach with the game planning this week. Morris claimed on Monday that he is certain he knows offensive football. Hopefully, we’ll get more evidence of that knowledge this Saturday than we have the past two weeks.

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Terry J. Wood <![CDATA[Black, Blanchett conjure magic in ‘House with a Clock in Its Walls’]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190803 2018-09-21T15:10:10Z 2018-09-21T15:10:10Z

Universal Pictures

If you are looking for an early Halloween treat, Jack Black, Kate Blanchett, and director Eli Roth have one for you with their latest film “The House With a Clock in Its Walls.”

New In Local Theaters

  • The House With a Clock in its Walls (PG) 1 hr. 45 min.
    (AMC Fiesta Square, Malco Razorback, Malco Rogers Towne, Malco Springdale, Bentonville Skylight)
    » Watch trailer
  • Fahrenheit 11/9 (R) 2 hr. 5 min.
    (AMC Fiesta Square, Malco Razorback, Malco Pinnacle Hills)
    » Watch trailer
  • Assassination Nation (R) 1 hr. 47 min.
    (AMC Fiesta Square, Malco Razorback, Malco Pinnacle Hills)
    » Watch trailer
  • Life Itself (R) 1 hr. 57 min.
    (AMC Fiesta Square, Malco Razorback, Malco Springdale, Malco Pinnacle Hills)
    » Watch trailer

The film is an adaptation of the acclaimed 1973 novel by John Bellairs which tells the tale of orphan Lewis Barnavelt (Owen Vaccaro) who goes to live with his eccentric uncle Jonathan (Black) when his parents are killed in a car wreck.

Uncle Jonathan’s house is anything but quaint. Lewis discovers that his uncle’s creaky old mansion is not only enchanted but also haunted by a ticking clock that is counting down to doomsday.

Uncle Jonathan, you see, is a warlock who is searching for the doomsday clock which the house’s deceased former owners Issac and Selena Izzard (Kyle McLachlan and Renee Elise Goldsbury) hid within the walls. Next door neighbor Florence Zimmerman (Blanchett), a powerful witch, is helping Jonathan with his quest to get to the bottom of ticking.

Finding the clock becomes more complicated when Lewis accidentally resurrects Isaac from his tomb while casting a Halloween spell to impress his popular classmate Tarby (Sunny Suljic).

Black and Blanchett’s chemistry is delightful in this comic-fantasy that’s just spooky enough to be fun for kids and clever enough to capture adults’ attention. Black’s mania and Blanchett’s restrained charm worked surprisingly well together. Their performances lift the movie above the average kiddie-movie fare. I’d enjoy seeing them paired together in another film.

Roth, known for his torture-porn “Hostel” series, shows a tremendous amount of restraint in this PG-rated film compared to his past efforts, but his knack for scares gives the film just enough bite to set a spooky but playful mood for the oncoming Halloween season.

(PG) 1 hr. 45 min.
Grade: B


Classic Corner

Rebel Without a Cause

Warner Bros.

The Malco Razorback Cinema is showing a special screening of “Rebel Without a Cause” at 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 23.
Viewed through modern eyes, “Rebel Without a Cause” may seem too melodramatic to be enjoyed, but given half a chance, the movie becomes engrossing.

Was star James Dean too over the top as the misunderstood and angst-ridden Jim, or was his performance on a higher plane than his co-stars? Consider that while watching the movie.

Dean’s character is frustrated by his hen-pecked father Frank (Jim Backus), who always acquiesces to his domineering wife Carol (Ann Doran).

Director Nicholas Ray generally shoots Backus in a submissive position to his co-star Doran. He’s often crying, and in one effective scene, he’s wearing an apron while down on his knees. Jim longs for his father to be a masculine role model but Backus’ Frank rolls over every time. Jim resorts to alcohol to relieve his confusion and emotional pain.

Judy (Natalie Wood) is a teen who longs for her father’s approval, but for whatever strange reason, her dad (William Hopper) finds it difficult to express his love for his teenage daughter. Judy takes to wearing racy — for the time — clothing than only entices her father’s anger. She acts out further. When she meets Jim, at first Judy is unimpressed, but after a tragedy one night, they are drawn together.

Sal Mineo plays Plato, a disturbed young man who commits a heinous act early in the film. He looks up to Jim, and oddly sees him a sort of a father figure, though Jim is just a few years older. Plato’s father abandoned him and his mother when Plato was a child, and now his absentee mother neglects her son, leaving a maid to rear him.
A misunderstanding between Jim and Plato sets the younger boy off, and this does not end well for the trio of youths, who had formed a pseudo family in an attempt to fulfill their emotional needs.

There is true feeling in the work of Dean, Mineo, Wood, and the other other actors. It’s a true step forward for naturalism in American cinema.

Oscar voters also missed the boat by not nominating Ray for an Academy Award for directing because his use of the camera in the film is about as close to poetic as as a filmmaker can get.

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[NWA Beer News: Jesse Core steps aside, Bike Rack Brewing sued]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190776 2018-09-20T21:35:32Z 2018-09-20T21:34:50Z

Jesse Core / Courtesy photo

It’s been an interesting week in the local beer business with the news of a shakeup in leadership at one of the longest running regional breweries, and a lawsuit at a fast-growing brewery in Benton County.


Jesse Core out as CEO at Core Brewing & Distilling Co.

Jesse Core, founder of Core Brewing & Distilling Co., has stepped aside as CEO, the company announced today.

Core, who started the brewery eight years ago, will become chairman of the company’s board of directors. The change is effective immediately.

In his new role, he’ll transition toward special projects, investor relations, and brand ambassadorship.

“For eight years, I have invested my heart and soul into this company,” said Core in a statement issued by the company. “(But) the time has come for a change in order to usher in the new era of prosperity our team and loyal supporters deserve.”

Core founded his brewery using a 1-barrel system with several small fermenters in September 2010. He delivered two kegs to local bar Kingfish once a week, and took feedback from customers to help refine his recipes. The company grew and went on to build a 25-barrel brewhouse in Springdale in 2012.

The board appointed Christopher Reed as the new CEO. Reed previously led the company’s sales and marketing division, and will now assume responsibility for the day-to-day operations.

“Chris has tremendous industry knowledge and has repeatedly proven that he is the correct person for the job,” said Core. “I am beyond proud that he is leading our company.”

Reed immediately promoted two members within the Core team. Ron Schmidt has moved from head brewer to director of operations, and Rodrigo Medina was promoted to head brewer.

“Ron has been the catalyst behind a cultural change within the organization that has been nothing short of remarkable,” said Reed. “His knowledge, experience, and tenacious commitment to quality is second to none.”

Medina is responsible for many of Core’s newest beers, included several New England style IPAs and imperial stouts.

“Rodrigo’s creativity and artistry is unparalleled, and we feel confident that he will elevate the expectations of the Arkansas craft consumer,” Reed said.

Additionally, two new board members were appointed, including Bernie Adcock, chief supply officer at Tyson Foods, and Rich Pascucci, former chief growth officer of Pabst Brewing Company.


Bike Rack Brewing Co. sued

Bike Rack Brewing Co. is being sued by one of its co-founders, according to a report from the Northwest Arkansas Business Journal.

A lawsuit filed in Benton County Circuit Court shows that Steven Outain, a co-owner of the brewery and its chief development officer, has sued the other co-owners along with the company, with allegations of a breach of fiduciary duty and disregard of the company’s operating agreement.

Outain is seeking $2 million in punitive damages.

Court documents show a clear internal strife that has developed between the co-owners this year, which has led to a disagreement over the worth of the four-year-old company.

The company grew its production by nearly 25 percent last year, according to the Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Control Division’s most recent permit report.

Bike Rack has two locations in Bentonville, and will soon open a third location in downtown Springdale.

» Read the full story at talkbusiness.net

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Ought, Russian Circles, Sun June, The Body, and others to play upcoming ‘On the Map’ shows]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190764 2018-09-20T19:38:28Z 2018-09-20T19:38:28Z

Russian Circles / Courtesy

Local music promoter, show book-er and occasional Flyer contributor Roger Barrett has been working overtime lately.

Barrett has been announcing shows under his ‘On The Map‘ umbrella at venues all over Fayetteville recently, and there are seven such shows featuring touring artists coming up this fall.

The series kicks off with Canadian band Ought from Montreal at Smoke & Barrel on Oct. 6. The band, whose 2014 debut More than Any Other Day made pretty much every album of the year list that year, just released a new record back in February.

On Oct. 16, metal-y instrumental band Russian Circles from Chicago will perform at George’s with Fotocrime and locals, Terminus. They released a live album last year that kills it. Listen to that to get an idea of what to expect.

New York indie band Guerilla Toss will be in town for a show on Oct. 21 with locals The Phlems and Whoopsi. Check them out here.

After that, Austin sad song singer-songwriter Molly Burch plays Smoke & Barrel Nov. 8, “regret-pop” band Sun June plays George’s Nov. 13, experimental metal band The Body (featuring former Fayettevillians Chip King and Lee Buford) will be George’s Nov. 23, and Norman, OK indie band Broncho returns to town for a show Dec. 14 at George’s.

The full list of shows, including ticket links, is below. For a bit more information, visit the On The Map Facebook page.

On the Map Shows – Fall 2018

Oct. 6 – Ought w/ Ankle Pop – Smoke & Barrel Tavern. (Tickets are $12.)
Oct. 16 – Russian Circles w/ Fotocrime, Terminus – George’s Majestic Lounge (Tickets are $15-$17)
Oct. 21 – Guerilla Toss w/ The Phlems, Whoopsi – Smoke & Barrel Tavern (Tickets are $10-$12)
Nov. 8 – Molly Burch w/ Constant Stranger (Justin Peter Kinkel-Schuster) – Smoke & Barrel Tavern (Tickets are $10-$12)
Nov. 13 – Sun June w/ Magnolia – George’s Majestic Lounge (Tickets are $8-$10)
Nov. 23 – The Body w/ Author & Punisher, Bones of the Earth – George’s Majestic Lounge (Tickets are $8-$10)
Dec. 14 – Broncho w/ White Mansion – George’s Majestic Lounge (Tickets are $12-$15)

Ought – Desire

Russian Circles – Death Rides a Horse

Guerilla Toss – Meteorological

Molly Burch – To the Boys

Sun June – Young

The Body – Live at Saint Vitus Bar

Broncho – Sandman/Boys Got To Go

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Reminder: Fayetteville business license renewals due by Oct. 31]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190758 2018-09-20T13:27:46Z 2018-09-20T13:27:46Z

 

City officials are reminding business owners to renew their Fayetteville business licenses by Wednesday Oct. 31 to avoid late fees.

Renewal fees are $15 and can be submitted online, in person, or by mail.

Since 2011, all businesses – including home-based businesses – within the city limits must obtain a business license unless the business qualifies for an exemption.

For more information, or to apply or renew a license, visit fayetteville-ar.gov or call the Business License Clerk at 479-575-8233.


Renew online

All business licenses can be renewed online, even if the original application was made on paper. To renew online, visit the online renewal webpage. Debit and credit cards (MasterCard or Visa) are accepted.

Renew in person

To renew in person, visit the Development Services office, located at 125 W. Mountain Street in downtown Fayetteville. The office is open Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. (closed on federal holidays).

Renew by mail

To renew by mail, send a check or money order, payable to “City of Fayetteville.” Include your business license number (located on your current business license) or the physical address of the business. Send payment to:

City of Fayetteville
Business License Clerk
113 W. Mountain Street
Fayetteville, AR 72701

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Friends of Fayetteville Public Library to host lobby book sale]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190756 2018-09-20T13:18:22Z 2018-09-20T13:18:22Z

The Friends of Fayetteville Public Library will host a lobby book sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 22 and from 1-5 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 23.

All paperback books, media and children’s books will cost 50 cents, while all hardback books will cost $1.

Proceeds from the sale will support the library.

For more information, or to join Friends of Fayetteville Public Library, call 479-856-7104.

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Alan Jackson show scheduled for the Walmart AMP postponed]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190750 2018-09-19T22:15:08Z 2018-09-19T22:12:59Z

Courtesy

The Alan Jackson concert scheduled for this weekend at the AMP has been postponed due to a death in Jackson’s family.

The concert will be rescheduled at a later date.

Walton Arts Center issued the following statement on Wednesday.

In consideration of recent tragic events impacting Alan Jackson and his family, the Country Music Hall of Famer’s Saturday, Sept. 22 concert at the Walmart AMP is being postponed.

The Jackson family has been grieving the loss of Jackson’s son-in-law – husband of his oldest daughter – who died unexpectedly last week after suffering severe traumatic head injuries in a fall, a month shy of the couple’s first anniversary.

Management, promoters and the venue are working to reschedule the show, and more details will be released once they have been finalized. All tickets will be honored once a rescheduled date has been determined.

The Walmart AMP extends its sympathy and support to Jackson and his family. The Jackson family thanks everyone for their understanding during this difficult time.


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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Arkansas 2019 football schedule released]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190745 2018-09-19T21:15:55Z 2018-09-19T21:14:26Z

Courtesy, ArkansasRazorbacks.com

The schedule for Arkansas football’s 2019 season came out yesterday.

Arkansas will play four non-conference games in Fayetteville, versus Portland State (Aug. 31), Colorado State (Sept. 14), San Jose State (Sept. 21) and Western Kentucky (Nov. 9).

According to ArkansasRazorbacks.com, it’s the first time for Arkansas to play Portland State, San Jose State, and Western Kentucky in the school’s history.

The Hogs will only play two SEC games in Fayetteville in 2018, when they take on Auburn on Oct. 19, and Mississippi State a couple weeks later on Nov. 2. That’s because the Missouri game scheduled for the end of the season has been moved back to Little Rock (Nov. 30), and the Hogs are still playing their annual matchup versus Texas A&M in Dallas (Sept. 28).

The Hogs will travel to Ole Miss (Sept. 7), Kentucky (Oct. 12), Alabama (Oct. 26), and LSU (Nov. 23).

The full schedule for the 2019 season is below.

Arkansas 2019 Football Schedule

Aug. 31 – Portland State
Sept. 7 – at Ole Miss
Sept. 14 – Colorado State
Sept. 21 – San Jose State
Sept. 28 – vs. Texas A&M (Arlington)
Oct. 12 – at Kentucky
Oct. 19 – Auburn
Oct. 26 – at Alabama
Nov. 2 – Mississippi State
Nov. 9 – Western Kentucky
Nov. 23 – at LSU
Nov. 30 – Missouri (Little Rock)

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David Conrads <![CDATA[‘I’m passionate about this state:’ Daniel Campbell on making movies in Arkansas]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190640 2018-09-21T16:18:32Z 2018-09-19T18:40:29Z

Daniel Campbell / Courtesy photo

Daniel Campbell’s initial foray into filmmaking, a modest, 14-minute movie titled “Antiquities,” won the Charles B. Pierce Award for the best film made in Arkansas at the Little Rock Film Festival in 2010 and racked up awards at other festivals around the country. His next two short films, “The Orderly” (2011) and “The Discontentment of Ed Tailfair” (2013), also won the top award at the Little Rock Film Festival those years.

Not bad for a young guy from small-town Arkansas who majored in business, never attended film school and never even aspired to be a filmmaker until he was well out of college.

If Campbell did not have filmmaking in his career sights while he was growing up in Haskell, outside of Benton, he was a committed film buff who claims to have seen the Coen Brothers’ “Raising Arizona” at least a hundred times before he graduated from Harmony Grove High School.

“I always loved film but never took it seriously as a career choice until after college,” he said in a recent telephone interview from his home in North Little Rock. “My film school was just watching movies.”


What:Fayetteville Film Festival
When: Sept. 20-22
Where: Downtown Fayetteville
Single Tickets: $7-$10
Film Lover Pass: $50-$60
VIP All Access: $80-$100
Info: Visit fayettevillefilmfest.org.

The turning point for Campbell came when his father, with whom he was very close and shared a love of movies, was killed in a car crash. That event sent Campbell on a 10-week, solo backpacking trip through eastern Europe, Southeast Asia and Australia. He returned with a new perspective on life and a new career goal: making movies.

Campbell was working, with very little success, in sales at a radio station in Little Rock in 2008 when he connected with Sarah Tackett, who also lived in Little Rock and did casting for major Hollywood movies. A series of interviews with her led to a job in the casting department of “Nothing But the Truth,” a political thriller shot in Memphis, starring Kate Beckinsale and Matt Damon. Campbell returned from the shooting fired up to write a script and direct a film of his own.

The result was “Antiquities,” a short film based on his childhood experiences spent going with his family to antique malls in Saline County. He made the film for just a few hundred dollars and shot it entirely in Arkansas.

“I wanted to set it in a weird, bizarre place and I wanted to show Arkansas in a positive light,” he said. “I wanted to show the quirky side of Arkansas and the charming side.”

It was at the 2010 Little Rock Film Festival that Campbell met writer, actor and fellow-Arkansan Graham Gordy. The two found they had a lot in common, including having lost their respective fathers at a young age, and formed Mortuus Pater Pictures together, along with Gary Newton, a former executive with the Little Rock Regional Chamber of Commerce.

The first production of Mortuus Pater is “Antiquities,” loosely based on Campbell’s 2010 short and expanded to feature length. Campbell directed a script he wrote with Gordy, who also has a supporting role in the film. The story centers on Walt, who, after his father’s death, moves to his father’s hometown to learn more about who his father was. Walt takes a job in an antique mall and is introduced to a host of quirky characters who inhabited his father’s world. The film will be shown as part of the Fayetteville Film Festival on Friday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m. at the Global Campus Theatre.

For his first feature film, Campbell got to work with a much bigger budget than usual ($625,000) and a cast of seasoned professionals, including Academy Award winner and Arkansas native Mary Steenburgen.

“She was unbelievably pleasant to work with,” Campbell says of directing Steenburgen. “I was so nervous about it because she’s done so much and she’s such a distinguished actress. We had a really good conversation in her trailer. She said she loves getting direction. When we got on the set, she was completely trusting. She had some amazing ideas. It was a true collaboration.”

Although he never went to film school, Campbell’s experience working as a production assistant on a number of films gave him the opportunity to watch movie directors at work, and he made the most of those experiences. In particular, he cites watching Jeff Nichols, yet another Arkansas native, directing “Mud,” which was shot in various locations in the Arkansas Delta and released in 2012. Seeing how Nichols, himself a very young director at the time, work with veteran actors like Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon, Ray McKinnon and Sam Shepard was a education in itself, especially when problems came up.

“I watched how he carried himself on the set and how he communicated,” Campbell said. “He’s very calm. I took a lot from that. I learned to keep my composure on the set from watching him.”

Like the earlier version, “Antiquities” was shot entirely in Arkansas — the exteriors in Eureka Springs and Hot Springs, and the interiors in Little Rock, Jacksonville and other locations. Campbell says he wanted to set a movie in Arkansas that wasn’t focused on ignorance, poverty and general backwardness.

“I’m passionate about this state and I just wanted to show it off,” he said. “We created this company [Mortuus Pater Pictures] with a shared passion for the state and for making films and wanting to make films in Arkansas. Unless a script calls for an ocean or a jungle, we want to make it here.”

For the next Mortuus Pater production, Campbell and his partners are mulling over some ideas, mindful that the follow-up to a successful movie is, in some ways, more important than the initial movie itself.

“We’re in the process of figuring out what the next film will be,” he said. “And figuring out how to shoot it in Arkansas.”


This article is sponsored by First Security Bank. For more great stories of Arkansas food, travel, sports, music and more, visit onlyinark.com.
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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Fenix Fayetteville gallery to debut new ‘Influences’ group show Oct. 4]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190647 2018-09-19T16:01:20Z 2018-09-19T16:01:20Z

A new painting by Steven Schneider inspired by the work of the late Fayetteville painter, William Mayes Flanagin

Local artists in the Fenix Fayetteville collective will debut a new group show next month.

The artists announced the new show, titled Influences will open on Oct. 4, and run through Dec. 1 at the gallery.

The show will feature small works by Fenix artists that examine “muses and other sources of impact,” according to a press release issued about the exhibit.

In addition, artist Steven Schneider has created a piece influenced by the work of late painter and former Fenix member, Bill Flanagan. The painting will be auctioned off to raise funds for the creation of the William Mayes Flanagan Studio at Fenix Fallery.

An opening reception for Influences is scheduled for 5 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 4 to coincide with First Thursday.

The gallery is located at 16 West Center Street in Fayetteville.

For more information about Fenix Fayetteville, visit their website.

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Markham Hill development discussion begins in Fayetteville]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190627 2018-09-20T13:28:03Z 2018-09-19T14:43:27Z

Pratt Place Inn / Courtesy photo

The Fayetteville City Council on Tuesday heard from neighbors about proposed changes atop Markham Hill just west of the University of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville.

Specialized Real Estate Group, the local firm that owns the Pratt Place Inn and about 144 acres on the hill, wants to expand the event center and build a conservation-based neighborhood.

Up for consideration is a redesign of the planned zoning district that encompasses Pratt Place, along with a rezoning of the surrounding land. As part of the proposal, Specialized has offered a bill of assurance to permanently conserve the forest land on the west side of the mountain.

Seth Mims, president of Specialized Real Estate Group, gave a brief presentation about the project. He said part of the plan is to revitalize Pratt Place, which serves as a popular as a wedding venue, but has only seven rooms and one cottage for overnight guests. With so few rooms, no restaurant and no other commercial uses, he said the event center simply isn’t profitable.

An expanded Pratt Place, Mims said, would include 5,000 square feet of event space and enough new hotel-format buildings and cabins to accommodate an additional 80 guests. Plans call for 12,000 square feet of restaurant and commercial space, and about 43 single-family homes along the eastern portion of the property. The inn, barn, cottage, and a nearby cabin and storage building would remain. The cabin would become an overnight suite and the cottage would become a commercial space. Plans also call for several single-story cabins, a conference and meeting space, a two- or three-story hotel-style building, and smaller structures like an office, guest services center, and some shops. Company officials have said the restaurant and retail spaces would be open to the public.

The current planned zoning district contains 74 acres and the surrounding land is zoned RSF-4 (Residential Single-Family 4 Units Per Acre). Specialized seeks to reduce the PZD to 24 acres and rezone 75 acres as RI-U (Residential Intermediate-Urban). The remaining 44 acres would be rezoned to RA (Residential Agricultural) and then preserved.

Mims said the 44 acres would be preserved either through a conservation easement or a gift to a land trust or municipality.

C-PZD conceptual plan / Specialized Real Estate Group

The areas outside Pratt Place would be developed into a neighborhood in phases over the next 10-20 years. Officials have said inspiration for the neighborhood comes in part from Serenbe, a 1,000-acre community built over the past 15 years in Fulton County, Georgia. About 600 people live in the community’s 350 homes set among preserved forests and meadows.

The bill of assurance promises that despite the change from RSF-4, the overall density for the rezoned property will remain at four units per acre, or 476 units. Mims said with smaller lots, the neighborhood would have the same density as what’s allowed today, but retain more green space.

The binding agreement also commits Specialized to keep at least 50 percent of the total RI-U and RA acreage as passive and active open space. That includes the preserved conservation area, but also adds landscaping, gardens, pocket parks, meadows, watersheds, outdoor plazas and existing or new walking or multi-use trails throughout the neighborhood.

After public comment was opened, the first resident to speak Tuesday was against the rezoning and called the project “a fantasy” and said the original C-PZD was a promise to the neighbors that should be honored by not being changed.

Some residents who spoke against the plan mentioned access and traffic concerns as reasons why the rezoning should be denied, but most said development would destroy the natural habitat of the historical hillside, and that the area should stay preserved.

Council member Marsh said she wanted to remind the audience that the current zoning already allows the property owner to develop the land in a typical 4-units-per-ace fashion by right. This new zoning, she said, would keep the same density that’s currently allowed while preserving more natural habitat than could be fit into a typical RSF-4 neighborhood.

“I keep hearing people refer to this as ‘a preserve,’ when really this is private property that has yet to be developed,” said Marsh. “I think it’s important we recognize that this is not publicly owned land.”

City documents show about 21 emails were sent to the City Clerk’s office in support of the project, with only about eight against. Those opposed, however, were in the majority at Tuesday’s meeting, with 17 speaking against the proposals and only two in favor.

The second reading of the ordinance will take place on Oct. 2.

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Paid Advertisement <![CDATA[New Businesses and Grand Openings: Sacred Leaf CBD]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190575 2018-09-18T21:39:08Z 2018-09-19T13:30:45Z New Businesses is a monthly advertising feature allowing recently-opened businesses to introduce themselves to Fayetteville.

College Sitter Contact / Courtesy

Sacred Leaf CBD

Owner: Cyrus Riahi

Location: 121 West Township, Suite 16, Fayetteville 72703

Website/Social Media Links:
Website: www.cbdsacredleaf.com
Facebook: facebook.com/cbdfayettevillear/

What do you offer?
We offer the most ethically sourced, premium quality, full spectrum cannabinoid extracts from low THC cannabis hemp plants. We have a great line of products, and most important, we assist in the education of our customers about CBD and how it can address their particular issue.

Anything else you’d like to tell Fayetteville about your new business?

We want to invite the citizens of Fayetteville to pay us a visit. We offer a comfortable atmosphere where your questions and concerns are addressed in a friendly, personal manner. We have FREE samples of our products. We offer lab results for these products, to give you, the consumer, peace of mind that you are getting the quality you are looking for. We have staff that are knowledgeable and are more than ready to assist you with whatever you need. We are open 7 days a week for your convenience. We want to be YOUR source for all things CBD.


Paid AdvertisementThis post paid for by the businesses represented above. If you’d like to advertise your new business or grand opening in a future promotion similar to this, call Dustin at 479-387-1002 or send us a message.

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Todd Gill http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/toddgill/ <![CDATA[Fayetteville City Council recap: Sept. 18, 2018]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190500 2018-09-19T13:21:57Z 2018-09-18T22:15:42Z

File photo

On the agenda…

  • Approval of the 2018 millage levy.
  • Reenacting the city’s parking lot landscape standards.
  • Clarifying requirements for adequate space and screening of recycling and trash containers.
  • Requiring residential garbage carts to be at the curb by 5 a.m.
  • Rezoning 7.64 acres at 1910 N. Old Wire Road.
  • Rezoning 0.84 acres southeast of Gregg Avenue and Ash Street.
  • Rezoning 119 acres on Markham Hill.
  • Approval of a C-PZD at Pratt Place Inn on Markham Hill.

» Download the full agenda

A meeting of the Fayetteville City Council began at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018 inside room 219 of City Hall, located at 113 W. Mountain St. in Fayetteville.

Listed below are the items up for approval and links to PDF documents with detailed information on each item of business.


Roll Call

Present: Adella Gray, Sarah Marsh, Mark Kinion, Matthew Petty, Mayor Lioneld Jordan, Justin Tennant, Sarah Bunch, John La Tour, Kyle Smith
Absent: None

» View current attendance records


City Council Meeting Presentations, Reports and Discussion Items

1. Nominating Committee Report (Details)
Pass 8-0

Nominees:
Airport Board – No applicants
Animal Services Advisory Board – No applicants
Environmental Action Committee – Mike Wiederkehr
Fayetteville Arts Council – No applicants
Town & Gown Advisory Committee – Marsha Scott

Discussion: Council member Marsh said the Town & Gown Advisory Committee nominee (Marsha Scott) works with the University of Arkansas as a consultant, and that the council needs to clarify what it means by an “at large” member, which is the position Scott applied for. Marsh said the committee this week passed a resolution (by a 7-5 vote) asking the City Council to further define “at large” before the nominee is approved, in an effort to ensure the position isn’t filled by someone who is affiliated with one of the two entities (University of Arkansas or City of Fayetteville). Marsh said there were three other well-qualified applicants who aren’t affiliated with the university. She suggested removing Scott from the list of nominees and keeping the Town & Gown position open until the council can look into the matter.

Bunch agreed and said it’s important, for the sake of transparency, to further define “at large.”

Smith said he would rather have seen the committee make this decision before the application period opened, and said he’d like to move forward with approval tonight.

Kinion agreed with Smith, and said removing all members who have any affiliation with either the university or city would be too limiting.

Tennant said he agrees with Smith and Kinion’s comments, but would reluctantly agree to hold the position open since there isn’t a Town & Gown Advisory Committee meeting scheduled until January.

La Tour agreed with Tennant and said when the council has the luxury of time, it should wait and make the right decision.

Gray said as a former chair of the Nominating Committee, it can be a long process to apply for a volunteer position and then wait – sometimes for hours – to be interviewed. She said while it might be a good idea to further define “at large” she feels very strongly that the council should move forward and approve the nominee tonight. She likened Marsh’s proposal to “changing the rules in the middle of the game” as far as the applicants are concerned.

Petty said the Nominating Committee was split on its decision to nominate Scott, and for that reason, he would vote in favor of Marsh’s request.

Marsh’s amendment passed 5-3 (Gray, Kinion and Smith voted against).

When asked about the next step to take, City Attorney Kit Williams said a specific definition of “at large” could be created solely for the Town & Gown Advisory Committee, but that it would require a change to city code, which would need sponsorship by a council member and approval from the full council.

Vote: The nominees were approved by a vote of 8-0, but Scott was removed from the list.

2. Housing Authority Board Appointment (Details)
Pass 8-0

Nominees: Kristen Bensinger and Evelyn Rios Stafford

Discussion: There was no public comment, and no objection from the council.

Vote: The nominees were approved by a vote of 8-0.


Consent

Consent items are approved in a single, all-inclusive vote unless an item is pulled by a council member.

1. Approval of the Sept. 4, 2018 City Council Meeting Minutes
Pass 7-0

2. BlueInGreen, LLC and CH2M Hill Engineers, Inc. (Details): A resolution to approve lease, maintenance and operation agreements with BlueInGreen, LLC and CH2M Hill Engineers, Inc. for office and lab space at the Noland Water Resource Recovery Facility and an extension of BlueInGreen’s warranty and service of its equipment.
Pass 7-0

3. Stribling Equipment, LLC (Details): A resolution to authorize the purchase of a John Deere loader with forks from Stribling Equipment, LLC of Springdale, Arkansas in the amount of $131,350.00 pursuant to the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract for use by the Water and Sewer Operations Division.
Pass 7-0

4. PureGreen Equipment Services, LLC (Details): A resolution to authorize a contract with PureGreen Equipment Services, LLC d/b/a EZ Fuel-Blue1USA for the purchase of fueling equipment in the amount of $135,997.31 pursuant to the Sourcewell Cooperative Purchasing Contract for the Fuel Station Improvement Project, and to approve a project contingency in the amount of $20,000.00.
Pass 7-0

5. Hazmat Services Revenue (Details): A resolution to approve a budget adjustment recognizing hazmat services revenue received by the Fire Department from Washington County in the amount of $3,080.00 and increasing the related expense budget.
Pass 7-0

6. Assistance to Firefighters Grant (Details): A resolution to authorize the acceptance of a 90/10 Assistance to Firefighters Grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the amount of $123,637.00 for the purchase of physical fitness equipment, and to approve a budget adjustment to provide for matching funds in the amount of $12,363.00 and a project contingency in the amount of $20,000.00.
Pass 7-0

7. Arkansas Department of Aeronautics (Details): A resolution to authorize application for an Arkansas Department of Aeronautics 50/50 grant in the amount of $43,730.00 for the replacement of the terminal boiler.
Pass 7-0

8. Justice Assistance Grant (Details): A resolution to authorize acceptance of a 2018 Justice Assistance Grant for federal and state funding of the Fourth Judicial District Drug Task Force in the amount of $153,180.00, and to authorize Mayor Jordan to sign all necessary documents to receive the grant funds.
Pass 7-0

9. Maple Street Cycle Track Design (Details): A resolution to authorize a cost share with the University of Arkansas and the Walton Family Foundation for design services by McGoodwin, Williams & Yates, a division of Olsson & Associates, Inc. for the Maple Street Cycle Track with the amount to be paid by the city not to exceed $103,500.00.
Pass 7-0

10. 81 Construction Group, Inc. (Details): A resolution to approve a change order to the contract with 81 Construction Group, Inc. in the amount of $53,750.00 for the East Spyglass Hill Drive Drainage Improvements Project to expand the scope of services to include additional rock excavation and to add 45 days to the contract time due to delays caused by the unplanned rock excavation.
Pass 7-0

11. Sales & Use Tax Capital Improvement Bonds (Details): A resolution to approve a budget adjustment recognizing revenue generated from interest paid on funds for the Sales & Use Tax Capital Improvement Bonds series 2013 project in the amount of $37,286.91.
Pass 7-0

12. Unpaid HMR Taxes Letter of Agreement (Details): A resolution to authorize the mayor to sign a letter of agreement with Thrash Law Firm, Williams & Anderson PLC, the Finnell Firm, and Bird Law Group to file a claim on behalf of the City of Fayetteville for unpaid hotel/motel/restaurant taxes owed by online travel companies.
Pass 7-0

13. Boundary Line Agreement/Quitclaim Deed (Details): A resolution to authorize the mayor to sign a boundary line agreement and quitclaim deed to clarify the boundary line between property owned by Larry Henley, Jeremy Sharp, and Phillip Sparks near South Futrall Drive and Red Arrow Subdivision.
Pass 7-0

Notes: La Tour abstained from the Consent Agenda vote. He did not say why.

Unfinished Business

None


New Business

1. Ozark Kenworth, Inc. (Details)

An ordinance to waive competitive bidding and accept a repair quote of $22,176.02 from Ozark Kenworth, Inc.. d/b/a MHC Kenworth/Volvo – Springdale to repair a sewer cleaner truck that was involved in an accident.
Pass 8-0

Background: During a storm in July a city sewer cleaner truck struck a light pole resulting in damage to the vehicle. According to city documents, insurance funds have been received in the amount of $21,150.02.

Discussion: There was no public comment, and no objection from the council.

Vote: The ordinance was passed by a vote of 8-0.


2. 2018 Millage Levy (Details)

An ordinance levying a tax on the real and personal property within the City of Fayetteville, Arkansas, for the year 2018 fixing the rate thereof at 2.3 mills for general fund operations, 0.4 mills for the Firemen’s Pension and Relief Fund, 0.4 mills for the Policemen’s Pension and Relief Fund, 2.5 mills for Fayetteville Public Library operations, and 1.2 mills for the Fayetteville Public Library expansion; and certifying the same to the County Clerk of Washington County, Arkansas.
Pass 8-0

Background: Each year the city must approve an ordinance to renew the levy of ad valorem taxes on real and personal property. This ordinance will allow the city to continue to collect property taxes for the Policemen’s Pension and Relief Fund and the Firemen’s Pension and Relief Fund, and to collect money needed for the library expansion, which voters approved in 2016.

Discussion: One resident spoke and said despite the public vote to approve funding for the library expansion, the council would be making a mistake by re-approving those funds. He said the city was being “misled,” but did not say how. There was no objection from the council.

Vote: The ordinance was approved by a vote of 8-0.


3. Parking Lot Landscape Standards (Details)

An ordinance to reenact § 177.04 (d)(4) and (5) concerning perimeter landscaping requirement for parking lot landscape standards of the Unified Development Code.
Pass 8-0

Background: Staff said these requirements were previously adopted, but accidentally omitted during revisions made to city code. This ordinance would reenact those requirements.

Discussion: One resident spoke in favor of the ordinance. There was no objection from the council.

Vote: The ordinance was approved by a vote of 8-0.


4. Recycling and Trash Containers (Details)

An ordinance to amend § 166.25(d) of the Unified Development Code to clarify the development requirement for adequate space and screening of recycling and trash containers in commercial, office, and mixed-use developments.
Pass 8-0

Background: According to city documents, screening requirements exist, but don’t address the specific amount of space needed inside the enclosure. The proposal, staff said, would ensure that commercial, office and mixed-use developments have the space necessary to provide recycling and trash services now and in the future.

Discussion: La Tour asked if there was a fine if property owners don’t allocate the proper space once this is passed. Peter Nierengarten, the city’s director of sustainability and parking, said this is a tool to be used at the development level when new buildings are constructed. One resident spoke in favor of the ordinance.

Vote: The ordinance was approved by a vote of 8-0.


5. Residential Garbage Cart Time (Details)

An ordinance to amend § 50.20 Service Requirements in Chapter 50: Recycling and Trash Collection of the Fayetteville City Code to require residential garbage carts to be placed at the collection point by 5 a.m.
Pass 8-0

Background: The current time requirement is 6 a.m., but in the summer months, recycling workers typically begin an hour early in order to avoid being outside and working in the hottest part of the day. In other words, this change would codify a practice that is already in place, and would give trash collection workers some flexibility to do the same thing if it’s ever needed in the future.

Discussion: Marsh said this request is proof of how difficult the curb recycling process is for employees, and she’s happy to see this item brought forth. There was no public comment.

Vote: The ordinance was approved by a vote of 8-0.


6. RZN 18-6311 (1910 N. Old Wire Road/Sequoyah United Methodist Church) (Details)

An ordinance to rezone that property described in rezoning petition RZN 18-6311 for approximately 7.64 acres located at 1910 N. Old Wire Road from RSF-4, Residential Single Family, 4 units per acre to P-1, Institutional.
Pass 8-0

Background: Sequoyah United Methodist Church said that the rezone is necessary in order to bring the zoning into alignment with the property use, and to construct a rugby field. Both the Planning Commission and city staff are in favor of the request.

Location: Here’s a map…

Discussion: There was no public comment, and no objection from the council.

Vote: The ordinance was approved by a vote of 8-0.


7. RZN 18-6313 (SE of Gregg Avenue & Ash Street/Alpha Farms, LLC) (Details)

An ordinance to rezone that property described in rezoning petition RZN 18-6313 for approximately 0.84 acres located southeast of North Gregg Avenue and West Ash Street from RSF-4, Residential Single Family, 4 units per acre to RMF-24, Residential Multi Family, 24 units per acre.
Pass 8-0

Background: The applicant has not stated their development intent should the property be rezoned. Both the Planning Commission and city staff are in favor of the request.

Location: Here’s a map…

Discussion: There was no public comment, and no objection from the council.

Vote: The ordinance was approved by a vote of 8-0.


8. RZN 18-6317 (West of Markham Road/Markham Hill) (Details)

An ordinance to rezone that property described in rezoning petition RZN 18-6317 for approximately 119.43 acres located west of Markham Road from RSF-4, Residential Single Family, 4 units per acre and C-PZD, Commercial Planned Zoning District to rezone approximately 75.42 acres to RI-U, Residential Intermediate-Urban and approximately 44.01 acres to R-A, Residential Agricultural, subject to a bill of assurance.
Left on the first reading

Background: The changes would allow Specialized Real Estate Group to expand Pratt Place Inn and build a multi-phase, conservation-based neighborhood over the next 10 to 20 years. The plan would permanently preserve 44 acres of natural land.

The request includes a bill of assurance which promises that despite the change from RSF-4, the overall density for the rezoned property will remain at a maximum of four units per acre. It also commits Specialized to keep at least 50 percent of the total RI-U and RA acreage as passive and active open space. That includes the preserved 44-acre conservation area, but also adds landscaping, gardens, pocket parks, meadows, watersheds, outdoor plazas and existing or new walking or multi-use trails throughout the neighborhood.

For more information about the proposal, see our story from July.

Both the Planning Commission and city staff are in favor of the request.

Location: Here’s a map…

Discussion: Seth Mims, president of Specialized Real Estate Group, gave a brief presentation about the project. The council agreed to also hear about the next item on the agenda – since they’re both a part of the same project – so that the upcoming discussion can include comments about the entire project.

Mims said the original bill of assurance was recently revised to clarify that the conservation area would be preserved either through a conservation easement or a gift to a land trust or municipality.

The first resident to speak was against the rezoning and called the project “a fantasy” and said the original C-PZD was a promise to the neighbors that should be honored today by not being changed.

Several residents who spoke against the plan said development would destroy the natural habitat of the hill.

Council member Marsh said she wanted to remind the audience that the current zoning already allows the property owner to develop the non-C-PZD land in a typical 4-units-per-ace fashion by right. This new zoning, she said, would keep the same density that’s currently allowed while preserving more natural habitat than could be fit into a typical RSF-4 neighborhood.

Others who spoke against the project mentioned access and traffic concerns as reasons why the rezoning should be denied.

City documents show at least 21 emails sent to the City Clerk’s office in support of the project, with only eight against. Those opposed, however, were in the majority at tonight’s meeting, with 17 speaking against and only two in favor.

There was no council discussion tonight.

The second reading of the ordinance will take place on Oct. 2.


9. C-PZD 18-6318 (2231 W. Markham Road/Pratt Place Inn & Barn) (Details)

An ordinance to approve a Commercial Planned Zoning District entitled C-PZD 18-6318 for property located at 2231 W. Markham Road reducing the existing 68.99 acre Commercial Planned Zoning District to 24.06 acres while retaining the existing uses, and adding up to 5,000 square feet of event space, 12,000 square feet of restaurant or commercial space, 80 hotel rooms, and 43 dwelling units.
Left on the first reading

Background: This request is tied to the rezoning item above. Both the Planning Commission and city staff are in favor of the request with the following conditions of approval:

  1. Approval of this PZD does not imply compliance with city development or fire codes, grant approval of any development variance, or guarantee that it is feasible to develop to the maximum intensity and density of the proposed C-PZD and comply with all codes. Review for compliance with all applicable development codes will be required at each stage of development.
  2. A new street connection will be required to accommodate the volumes of traffic associated with this development, as depicted on Plat 2b. Construction of the street shall be determined at the time of development.
  3. A traffic study will be required with the first phase of development to fully evaluate on- and off-site traffic impacts and public improvements necessary to mitigate impacts to a less than significant level. This will include a full evaluation of improvements to the surrounding street network affected by project traffic including streets such as Markham Road, Cross Avenue, Halsell Road and Sang Avenue.

Location: Here’s a map of the C-PZD request area…

And here’s the C-PZD conceptual plan (click the image to enlarge) …

Discussion: See notes in the above item. The discussion will continue on Oct. 2.



Adjourned

This meeting was adjourned at 9:26 p.m.

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Artist Octavio Logo completes new mural in south Fayetteville]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190561 2018-09-20T13:28:18Z 2018-09-18T20:52:28Z

A new mural by artist Octavio Logo Lopez

A new mural was just completed on the south side of town.

Artist Octavio Logo, a painter originally from Mexico City who moved to the area a few years ago, on Tuesday put the finishing touches on a yet-to-be-titled composition on the building formerly home to a spring shop at 704 S. Washington Ave.

Building owner Zara Niederman, who recently purchased the property, said he approached Logo about creating the mural after helping he and his family purchase a house in the the neighborhood. Niederman said he helped develop the concept for the mural, but wanted to give Logo the freedom to create whatever he wanted with the finished product.

“With all the news going on nationally these days, I wanted (a concept) that would represent other cultures, and show that we support everyone (in south Fayetteville),” Niederman said. “As far as the mural itself, though, I wanted Octavio to have an opportunity to do whatever he wanted, so he took the lead in making it the way it was.”

Closer look at the left side of the mural depicting a Native American girl and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Staff photo

The mural showcases Logo’s signature colorful style, and depicts five figures – three prominent African American civil rights leaders in Martin Luther King Jr., Malcom X, and Maya Angelou, and two Native Americans.

Logo said he wanted to create an image that reflected some of the diversity and history of the area.

“South Fayetteville is one of the most diverse areas of the city, and the Trail of Tears crosses South Fayetteville,” he said. “Also, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard is just one block from there, and Mayo Angelou has some roots here in Arkansas. I wanted to create something that honored all of those things.”

The female Native American figure to the left, Logo said, is an unnamed child from the Navajo tribe that Logo found in his research for the piece.

“She looks really proud and beautiful with all this jewelry, and I wanted to honor her,” he said. “She is also the only child in the picture, and I thought it was important to talk about children too.”

A Native American chief and author/civil rights leader Maya Angelou are depicted on the right side of the mural

Staff photo

The male Native American on the right side of the pice is a Lakota/Sioux chief, Logo said.

Niederman said he is still working on his long-term plans for the building, that could eventually become a restaurant (or something else entirely). For now, it is under renovation to become an artist studio for Logo and at least one other artist. He said he hopes the mural remains in tact for a long time, though. He said he was a little anxious about how the project would be received by the neighborhood, but the reception has been overwhelmingly positive so far.

“The feedback from the neighborhood has been great,” Niederman said. “People have been really excited about it, so that has been good.”

Logo said he was overwhelmed by the amount of people from all walks of life who stopped by to talk about their connections to the building, and the neighborhood, as he worked on the piece over the last few weeks.

“I had people say they or their family members worked at the spring shop, or stop to talk about their fears about changes in the neighborhood,” he said.

“I got a feeling like I never have before painting murals (working on this project),” he said. “It was really beautiful.”

Logo signed the mural earlier on Tuesday (Sept. 18), but said he hasn’t decided on a name for the piece yet.

“I don’t have a name yet,” he said. “I guess it is finished, but not complete if that makes sense.”

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Fayetteville bike-share program launches Sept. 19]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190535 2018-09-19T15:48:26Z 2018-09-18T16:44:35Z

Staff photo

Need to borrow a bike? Fayetteville’s dockless bike-share program officially launches this week.

The new program, created through a partnership with the University of Arkansas and the Fayetteville Advertising and Promotion Commission and approved by the city council last month, will make available 290 standard 7-speed bicycles and 50 pedal-electric assist bicycles.

The bikes will be available after the launch event, set for 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 19 in front of the Fulbright Peace Fountain on the University of Arkansas campus.

The bike share program is administrated by Indiana-based company VeoRide. The company operates programs in nearly 20 cities, including Austin, Texas; Lawrence and Pittsburg, Kansas; and Champaign, Illinois.

VeoRide will offer five free riding coupons (worth $2.50 in credit) to new registered users through Oct. 3. The first 45 bikes are already available to reserve, with the balance to be available after the launch event on Wednesday.

During the event, Chancellor Joe Steinmetz and Mayor Lioneld Jordan are scheduled to speak, and VeoRide representatives will be on hand to answer questions and offer free access to ride the bikes.

After the free trial period, discounted subscriptions will cost $17 per month or $70 annually for regular users. Students, faculty and staff of the Fayetteville Public Schools and the University of Arkansas will pay $10 monthly or $35 per year. Subscriptions for low-income residents will be $4.99 per month or $28.99 annually. Subscribers will receive unlimited one-hour rides. Overage fees would be 50 cents for every 15 additional minutes. A subscription is not required to ride, however.

Bicycles will be available for pickup in and around the downtown area, along city trails, on the UA campus and at other locations.

Pay-per-ride fees are 50 cents per 15 minutes for the standard 7-speed bikes. A $1 unlock fee will be required to ride an e-Bike, and the cost is 10 cents per minute after that.

Would-be-riders can sign up for the program by downloading the VeoRide app. For a bit more information, including links to download the VeoRide app via the App Store and Google Play, visit veoride.com.

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[City seeks community input for stormwater study]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190530 2018-09-18T16:33:11Z 2018-09-18T16:14:14Z

City officials are seeking community input for a three-month study concerning stormwater and water quality in Fayetteville.

The first in a series of public input sessions on the topic is scheduled from 5:30-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20 in the Community Room at Ozark Natural Foods, 1554 N. College Ave.

According to the city’s website, the purpose of the study effort is to present options for sustainable funding for stormwater management, to reduce flooding, and protect water quality.

During the study, a consultant will review the city’s existing stormwater system and program, collect input from the City Council, staff, and citizen stakeholders regarding the current state, and the necessary and desired future state of stormwater programs in the city. From there, the group will work to develop options for funding based on the current and desired future states of the program, and present those options to the City Council for consideration.

A follow-up, drop-by information session is scheduled from 8 a.m. until noon on Saturday, Sept. 22 at the Fayetteville Farmers’ Market.

For a bit more information, visit fayetteville-ar.gov/study.

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Dustin Bartholomew http://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/author/dustinbartholomew/ <![CDATA[Tinkerfest event set for Oct 6 at Scott Family Amazeum]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190495 2018-09-18T15:23:47Z 2018-09-18T15:23:21Z

Tinkerfest 2016 / Photo: Facebook.com/Amazeum

Making. Building. Creating. Doing. A celebration of all of these things (and more) is coming up next month in Northwest Arkansas.

Tinkerfest, the one-day celebration of “creativity, curiosity, and hands-on learing” is set for 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Scott Family Amazeum, located at 1009 Museum Way in Bentonville.

The event will feature STEAM activities and other hands-on activities for attendees, along with presentations by makers, tinkerers, artists, and local creative folks sharing their work. In addition, a vehicle will be dismantled at this year’s event.

Admission to Tinkerfest is included in the paid daily admission / membership at the museum.

For a bit more information, visit amazeum.org.

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Terry J. Wood <![CDATA[Improvement is the measure of the Razorbacks for the rest of the season]]> https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/?p=190496 2018-09-18T15:17:36Z 2018-09-18T15:17:36Z

Connor Noland and Devwah Whaley / Photo: ArkansasRazorbacks.com

In the 1990s, there were more than a few falls when Razorback fans turned their thoughts to basketball before the football season was over.

Part of that was how poorly the football Razorbacks played during much of that decade and part of it was because Nolan Richardson had the Razorbacks rolling at the highest level.

But it was usually at least October before such talk began. We’re two weekends and change short of October, and it feels for all intents and purposes that the Razorback football season is over before it really got started.

Oh, there are still nine more playing dates on the schedule, but the way the Razorbacks are playing, I think more fans may be dreading Saturdays than looking forward to them.

I guess there always is the tailgate party?

I once made fun of the Ole Miss motto of always winning the tailgate party whether they won the game or not. Now the joke is not so funny. It hits too close to home.

Arkansas’ 44-17 loss to North Texas last Saturday and the 34-27 loss to Colorado State the week before were gut punches, knocking all the air out of the season.

If it wasn’t bad enough to absorb the losses, the Razorback program was further denigrated by falling for a Bush-league trick play that played upon a player’s fear of being flagged for a personal foul in the first half against North Texas, and at the beginning of the second half, a chorus of boos by frustrated Razorback fans.

I’m not sure which made me feel worse. I take that back, the booing made me feel worse.

It’s a free country, and there is no law against booing, but it is a counterproductive activity that only leaves a bad taste in the mouths of everyone involved. Fans booing their own team is a traitorous act. It’s kicking the program when it is already down.

Some will say the boos show that fans care. What it actually shows is ignorance and a misunderstanding of the big picture as well as a serious lack of class.

But everyone has their bad moments. I’ve certainly had mine.

Last year after Bret Bielema was fired before he could even warm up after the season-ending loss to Missouri, ESPN and SEC Network pundit Booger McFarland made the comment that Arkansas needs to accept who they are.

I’m not exactly sure what he was getting at. I suppose it was that Hog fans shouldn’t expect so much from their program or that being less than average is Arkansas’ place and that fans should just accept it.

While I certainly believe that Arkansas’ head football coaching job is difficult and challenging, Hog fans should should accept nothing less than winning seasons and bowl trips as the standard.

Obviously Arkansas’ program has fallen below that standard at the moment.

It’s way too soon to assume that first-year head coach Chad Morris and his offensive assistants are in over their heads at Arkansas, but it’s also hard to explain losses by an SEC team to the likes of Colorado State and North Texas no matter the circumstances.

Morris said Monday he is certain that he knows offensive football. He and his staff are in a position where they need to prove it to Hog fans because that knowledge has not shown up yet on the football field.

Arkansas’ defense has its issues, too. The one-on-one tackling was poor against North Texas, but six turnovers by the offense hung the defense out to dry.

Talent and a lack of experience in Morris’ style is an obvious issue on both sides of the ball. Recruiting better athletes and time are the only real cures for those problems.

The Razorbacks have their work cut out for them in their 6:30 p.m. Saturday matchup against No. 9 Auburn (2-1) in a game to be televised by the SEC Network.

Morris said that Ty Storey will start at quarterback. From what we’ve seen of him in the first two games, he has a greater understanding of the offense than the other quarterbacks, but he doesn’t have a major college arm.

If he were on a more talented team, one that excelled in the running game, crafty play calling could protect him. That’s not going to happen against the Tigers, which boast one of the best front sevens in the college game.

The past two seasons, the Razorbacks have experienced ugly losses to Auburn, and this Saturday probably won’t be any different.

As far as judging the Razorbacks the rest of the season, Hog fans need to watch for improvement, and considering the bulk of the opponents left to play, improvement might be difficult to clearly see on a week-to-week basis.

That’s not much consolation, but it’s what Hog fans have to hold on to at this moment.

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